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IQ2 Power Meter Pedals: First Rides Testing & Data Accuracy

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Two years ago (almost to the day), IQ2 announced their then crank arm spacer based power meter. It would fit in between any pedal type and any crank arm, and allow power on more or less any bike with any pedal. In theory, it’d be close to the holy grail.

In practice, a year later (almost exactly to the day again) that effort fizzled without any returns, and they announced a new goal – a pedal-based power meter. But not just one power meter, but a series of them – both road and mountain. For the road side they’d offer both single-sided and dual sided Look-Keo compatible pedals, while for the mountain side they’d offer the same single and dual options but in a Shimano SPD (MTB) compatible pedal.

Suffice to say, neither happened according to their timelines – but this weekend I got my second set (TLDR on the first set was three weeks ago I rode them and 20 mins into the first ride I found a hardware defect).

Given that y’all are incredibly eager to hear whether or not they’ve produced an accurate power meter, I figured I’d do a daily-double today and knock out both an indoor ERG workout and an outdoor varied-terrain workout and then look at the power meter accuracy data. Simple, right?

First, some ground rules:

1) This is *NOT* a full review. It’s two rides. Three if you count the broke-ass ride from three weeks ago. I typically test power meters for a month or more (many months often).

2) Second, this is DEFINITELY not sponsored. Whether or not they work I’ll tell you – just like I posted three weeks ago when it broke.

3) Third, I’ve only got a single-sided (left) road pedal. I don’t have dual-sided ones, and those sound like they’re sometime down the road. I don’t have a mountain pedal either.

4) I’m confident this is from their production line, but I’m not 100% confident this is what end users will receive. There were already some manufacturing tweaks related to assembly between the set three weeks ago and this set.

5) I’ve got no real clarity on when they’ll start shipping to real people.

Got all that? Good. Let’s try and break them. And for that you’ve got two options: You can watch the video, or read the text. Or be a cool kid and do both:

Onto the text bits for those that like textual things.

What’s in the box:

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Here’s the box, again, of the left-pedal only variant. Of course, like all pedal-based power meters, you’ll get a ‘dummy’ right pedal as well. This lacks the electronic elements, but otherwise looks almost the same from the exterior.

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Inside you’ll find the two pedals and next to them two CR2032 batteries. You’ll only use one battery.

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Below that is the pedal wrench and two spacers for the pedals:

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You’ll see the QR code to scan with your phone to install the app (technically it points to their site though, but close enough I guess):

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To install the battery you’ll crack open the side of the pedal with an Allen key and then slip the battery in there. Oh, and as far as weights go, ask and you shall receive:

IQ2 Left: 199g
IQ2 Right Pedal: 204g
Garmin Vector 3 Pedal: 161g (both sides same)
Favero Assioma Pedal: 152g (both sides same)

I don’t know why there’s such a big difference between the two. Obviously one has electronics and the other doesn’t, but I figured they’d make them the same. Perhaps it’s because the right pedal (non-electronics) is solid within the spindle. Here’s the two side by side:

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And for fun, here’s the flip-side:

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In any case, onwards to install!

Installation:

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For the most part, installation harkens back a bit to the older Look KEO/Polar/SRM EXAKT pedal installation process where you use a wrench to align things a certain way. It’s not as finicky as those units though, so that’s positive. But it’s definitely not as clean as Favero/Garmin/PowerTap or even the new SRM X pedal-based power meters. All of those you more or less just install as any other pedal.

To begin, you’ll notice the pedal has an inside component that rotates in and out of the spindle. I’d refer to this as the ‘swirly thing’. Basically, it’s what tightens into the crank arm and allows the positioning to be precise. Once you’ve got that snug against the pedal, then you’ll hand-tighten the pedal to the crank arm.

My pictures came out like crap for whatever reason, so instead, here’s a snippet from their install video. This is helpful for others, since they don’t have a written install guide. See, winning?

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Then you’ll loosen the ‘inside’ of the pedal spindle area with a hex wrench one turn:

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After that, you’ll use their pedal wrench to horizontally align against your crank arm, keeping the IQ2 logo facing upwards:

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Finally, you’ll tighten that inside nut/swirly thing up:

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Then, you’ll do a zero offset:

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Realistically, as I’ve found out – you’ll want to do a few sprints first, then do a zero offset, and perhaps toss in a few minutes for temperature stabilization too.

Also, somewhat annoyingly, this entire process has to be done watching a YouTube video – rather than being in the app or on a clickable web page with step by step pieces. So you’re trying to pause each step, make sure you’re turning things the right way, etc… My attempts at install are as follows

Set #1: First attempt – easy success, accurate instantly
Set #2: First attempt – thought it was good, then immediate accuracy dumpster fire
Set #2: Second through fourth attempts: A mess still, eventually got myself back to square zero
Set #2: Fifth attempt: Nailed it! A few sprints, a zero offset or five, and I’m good!

I suspect the issue with the middle ones was that it wasn’t quite tight enough. I had done it ‘normal pedal tight’, and I think it needed more, and developed a bit of play. The video says a torque wrench is optional – but I have a funny feeling you need to skew more towards gorilla tight than normal pedal tight. Just my guess.

In any case, good to go now.

Trainer Ride:

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For the indoor ride I loaded up TrainerRoad. In this configuration TrainerRoad only talked to the Wahoo KICKR (2018 Edition). And then I separately recorded the IQ2 power meter on a Garmin Edge 530:

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I also concurrently recorded the Wahoo KICKR on an Edge 830, while recording a Quarq DZero on a Fenix 6. I also had a few other things recording HR and what not from Polar Grit X.

For the test, I selected TrainerRoad’s Apple Orchard. This wasn’t a super-challenging workout in terms of crazy power, but I figured it’d be a good starting point to show both stability of power in longer chunks, as well as responsiveness in short 15-20 second test intervals.

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Note that what made it slightly more challenging is I did it 1.5x, since I spent the first attempt troubleshooting accuracy/installation issues. We’ll ignore that here and skip to when I got it nice and tight and happy.

For that, here’s that data set in the DCR Analyzer:

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As you can see, it’s pretty darn similar. Each of my power meters (including the trainer) took their turn with what is likely some sort of WiFi or other wireless signal interference. All of them dropped for a second or two. I’m going to ignore that, since all of them did it. I’ll build a tin-foil fort tomorrow.

First, let’s look at the warm-up phase (first 12 mins):

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While these are similar, there’s a bit more of a spikey-thing going on with the IQ2 power meter. You see it manifest itself as a slightly higher wattage than the others. I’m less concerned with it being consistently high (that’s actually to be expected), and more-so the fact that the purple line of the IQ2 spikes constantly above the others.

That said, the spikey-bits don’t appear in the outdoor ride later. So perhaps that’s just a bit of the unit settling in after install. It’s something I’ll look at more closely after longer-term testing.

Each of the interval sets are roughly the same, so I’ll just pick at the last one since I figure things would have settled the most by then (also, it has no drop-outs from any of the units).

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These are all super similar. We see the Quarq going a bit higher than the others on all sets, a trend I’ve seen in recent tests of mine. I don’t tend to see it as much outdoors. Not sure why. But in the scope of this test, it’s negligible – all these units are super close here.

If we look at the mean-max chart, you’ll see it’s crays close. The Wahoo KICKR is exactly where it should be (lower than the rest) – since it’s further down the drivetrain:

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And cadence is precisely identical to the Quarq, minus the two units’ varying signal dropouts:

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Aside from the slight bit of spikiness on the IQ2, there’s nothing to be upset about here. This is pretty much a picture-perfect set. I could add a bunch more words, or I could go eat cookies. All you need to know is earlier in this same paragraph.

(Note: All of the charts in these accuracy sections were created using the DCR Analyzer tool.  It allows you to compare power meters/trainers, heart rate, cadence, speed/pace, GPS tracks and plenty more. You can use it as well for your own gadget comparisons, more details here.)

Outside Ride:

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Next, I headed outside for a loop of varied terrain. Some smoother pavement, some grittier pavement, some cattle grates, some rougher brick, some gravel. Yes, gravel: Why not?

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Now, you can watch a fun montage of that in the video at the top of the post, but for here we’ll get straight into the data. Here’s the overview – in this case, I swapped out the Wahoo KICKR for a PowerTap G3 hub in my rear wheel. Quarq is still there as well. Here’s the high-level view (and here’s the data set):

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I know, that’s kinda messy and hard to see – outdoor rides usually look that way due to the constant shifts in intensity. So instead, let’s pick some pieces. First, this relatively steady section here:

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It starts off with a bit of a sprint off the line, and then digs in for some nice steady 250-325w cruising, before eventually ending at another stop-light. Still, all three power meters are within a few watts in most places. There’s no major outlier data points here, nor anything of massive concern. Keep in mind again, that the IQ2 is a left-only power meter, and as such, is going to be slightly more variable due to my normal leg differences. The Quarq & PowerTap G3 Hub are both total power units.

Next, another stoplight to stoplight chunk. For the most part, things are very similar here. A bit more variability in the second to second data points however across all units. I’m honestly not sure why. It’s not huge, but it’s not quite as crispy as some of the other portions. This was relatively normal pavement. There’s one drop-out from the IQ2 at the 34-minute marker that corresponds with a slight surge in the others. Given the precise timing, this seems far less likely to be an interference dropout issue, and far more likely to be an algorithm issue. It’s something I’ll be keeping an eye on in the future.

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Next, the gravel section. This was an out and back section, with the turn-around in the middle. As you can see, I was cruising at between 300 and 500w across this. Take no prisoners on my aero wheels!

That said, you see some slight variability from everyone – even with 5-second smoothing on here. It’s not as clean as other sections, but it’s also 100% totally usable data from all players. No player is any better than the other here.

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After that point, the Karoo unit that the PowerTap G3 was recording on ran out of battery. I didn’t exactly think that one through when I left the cave with sub-10% battery while also screen recording.

No worries, nothing exciting happens after that point anyway. As for the mean-max chart – super clean – anyone would be happy with this:

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On cadence, there’s a few blips in there – things that are hard to notice in the grand scheme of stuff – roughly 1-second blips, but easily seen on a chart like this.

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My guess is this is an area where a bit more work can be done still. In this section, it was mostly regular pavement, but it’s possible these exact blips line-up with some specific pot-hole or what-not.

Overall though, I think this is a pretty darn good start. With some very minor tweaks they can get that last little bit that might be causing the occasional drop-out in the algorithm. And I think it’d be pretty hard to argue that the extent of these dropouts is anything but minor right now.

Does the entire outside ride match the stability of some of the other players? No. But is it 99.9% of the way there? Yes, absolutely.

Wrap Up:

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When the first test unit they gave me three weeks ago failed, it did so in such a spectacular (and really unique) fashion that based on their response I could tell they were beyond perplexed. So much so that it actually gave me confidence in their abilities (as odd as that might sound). Sometimes power meter companies will try and hem and haw about how an issue isn’t an issue, or that it’s something I’m doing wrong, or blah-blah-blah.

Nope, IQ2 was pretty clear at the time that whatever went horribly wrong was something they’ve never seen before and that they really wanted to figure it out (it helped that I had video and data-driven evidence showing the issue). The result was many days of digging to find what they stated as a bad PCB due to it not being QA’d in assembly.

That process has since changed, and this second set seems just fine based on these two limited rides. Yes, their instructions need a re-write (actually, they just need to be written, it’s only in a silent video right now). And yes, they need to remember to tell you to put in the battery. And yes, I’d be curious to know why the pedals are that different in weight.

However, the thing you care about: Actual power accuracy out on the road – is very very impressive for this being this early in the product release cycle. Most power meters I see tend to take a number more months (even years) to reach this level after sales release. Albeit, this still hasn’t started shipping to regular consumers.

Still – I’m optimistic for where the company is going here. The next challenge (and it’s a challenge that has perplexed even the biggest power meter companies) is scaling up production from a handful of units per week to hundreds or thousands. But everyone likes a challenge, right?

With that – thanks for reading – and stay tuned for a full in-depth review sometime down the road after consumers start getting their units and I know for certain this is the same final hardware/software that you’re getting.

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192 Comments

  1. DougP

    Thanks MUCH Ray!
    This should make a bunch of us breathe a lot easier! 😉

    • stephen

      So I’ll have to pull off my carbon shimanos to put these on right?

    • No, you can use them with carbon cranks just fine. Just be sure to use the small spacer (like any other power meter pedal) to ensure it doesn’t hit the carbon cranks (you don’t have to use it if it doesn’t hit/touch).

    • Charlie

      Yeah I like that my Dura Ace 9100 pedals are going to be relegated to my KICKR bike instead of being able to slap them on like the original design. At least with how long these have taken to produce I’ve gotten 5k+ miles out of my current pedals so it’s not a total loss.

      Ray – thank you again for your reviews, they tell it like it is without a bunch of fluff and have a ton of data to back them up. If anything once my Shimanos need to be replaced I’m going to buy either Garmin or PowerTaps since we’re never getting our hands on our orders.

  2. Matthias van der Hallen

    While I didn’t back them, this review makes me cautiously optimistic that those who saw the very difficult kickstarter campaign through, will actually end up with a working, accurate power meter. 🙂

    • Jose A. Nuñez

      yes……but two years later!!!! (than we expected)

    • Matthias van der Hallen

      True, I do not envy those who made the jump. But a functional powermeter is better than no powermeter or a badly functioning one. Even if you have made other arrangements by now, at least there is some reselling value.

  3. Anders Majland

    Glad to see it work this time around – Looking forward for my dual set for road use – Originally backed so that i could easily use on both mtb and road. Then decision time after the change to pedals and i choose the road option… If i am happy with them when i get them i might have to buy mtb pedals as well. Can’t get to much data 🙂

  4. Justin B

    Ray, any idea what you expect the ballpark US price range to be for this power meter?

  5. Heinrich Hurtz

    Installation step 4 and step 6 show loosing and tightening of swirly screw to be the same direction?

  6. Mike

    Thanks. Was the pedal weighed before you put the battery in? I would guess the battery adds a few grams. Maybe that would get the 2 pedals to be closer to the same weight.

  7. Ian

    As a backer this is a relief, as a Speedplay user the redesign to pedals is useles to me. Hopefully the product accuracy will give it some value on the second hand market.

  8. Stuart p.

    I can’t see the review?? Title is there but no body

  9. Marc D.

    Great write we were long patient for. And some results now! Wow.

  10. Clemens

    Any remarks on the feel of the pedals? Clipping in and out was fine? Setting the tension spring works fine?

    And thank you very much I was expecting some graphs in the tool, but not already a nice video! Very much appreciated!

  11. tatocaster

    Thanks for sharing!

  12. Dean Andrews

    Backed iq2 on Kickstarter, so looking forward to more reviews.

  13. John Cross

    Thank you for this effort. It’s good to hear that I might get something I was really trying to avoid…I like your holy grail comment! Despite the holy fail, I am impressed at how the team has persisted.

    That said,

    1) I’m missing why a spacer would be required? I did a search and am not finding an explanation. On their web-site, I don’t find a mention either.
    2) This may be out of line as this will be my first set of pedal-based power meter equipment, though, the install looks to be less than solid from looking at the video. Is that the case?

    Thanks,
    John

    • cycloscott

      “1) I’m missing why a spacer would be required? I did a search and am not finding an explanation. On their web-site, I don’t find a mention either.”

      Carbon cranks. The carbon usually sits a little proud of the threaded insert and can be damaged by the pedal spindles which likely have a larger outside diameter than the insert. The spacers have an outside diameter that’s more aligned with the insert and push out the contact point with the face of the spindle just enough to avoid contact with the carbon.

    • Spacer: Yup, exactly as cycloscott noted.

      Install: It’s not as simple as a few other pedals, but it’s pretty quick nonethless. I’m curious to see if the quirks I saw on my middle install attempts were just random dumb-luck, or something perhaps a bit more indicative beyond that. Only people with numerous power meters would have noticed the difference (it was off by about 20w, both high…and low).

    • John Cross

      Thank you, cycloscott and DC Rainmaker.

    • Michal

      20W is definitely high, unless its at 1500W 😉

  14. Wesley Stocker

    Getting excited, do they output any cycling dynamics data that you can tell at this time?

    • No, no Cycling Dynamics.

    • Nothing would limit them from doing the power phase stuff or the TE or PS metric. The design they showed off would be incapable of doing pedal offset for two reasons. 1) The contra-flexure sensor they are using can’t detect offset like this no matter what, and 2) offset would be determined on average by both orientations and they can’t sense in the other orientation. Now, just like P2MAX that wouldn’t some someone from filling in the field with bogus data (PS/Balance).

  15. Tom

    I was THIS close to being a backer, but I’m not a gambler so I decided to take a wait and see approach. Had I been, I would be pretty excited about this. I’m still pretty excited. What impact do you think this will have on the pedal based power meter market? If the pricing holds true I’m thinking this has to be a win for the consumer, since if these are halfway decent I would expect prices to fall across the board in order for the current players to stay competitive. Is that just wishful thinking?

    • “What impact do you think this will have on the pedal based power meter market?”

      It will only have an impact if they can demonstrate they can scale up production to meaningful market-impacting levels (realistically thousands of units per week). If they’re only at hundred or a few hundred units, it won’t have any impact on the market.

  16. gtg007w

    Hmm. I was just about thinking of finally buying an Assioma Uno, but not necessarily in crunch for time (just riding on Zwift these days with my Suite Elite direct trainer). I might pick up the dual sided version of this instead? It has BT so as long as I can connect to my phone, should be good.

  17. Glen Stroik

    Were the pedals you tested the stainless version or titanium? The kick starter backers are getting titanium, and new orders will be stainless from what I remember. They seem kind of heavy, so hope you had the stainless version. After waiting 2 years, I hope you can be my first sort of good news?

  18. Ernie

    Thanks for quick review.. hope MTB version is as good.. and ready next year?? lol..

  19. Robert Marcus

    Maybe I missed this, but what type of cleat are they using?

  20. JD

    Are the “Sets” you describe multiple pedal sets or attempts installing the power metered pedal then removing it and installing it again?
    Would 20-25 Nm as shown in the install photo be considered “gorilla tight”?

    • Sets are different pedal sets. The first one that I broke, and then the second one that this post is based upon.

      20-25 would be chimpanzee tight, but in-line with what Garmin recommended. It’s more than most people would do though by hand if they didn’t have a torque wrench.

      (Interestingly, that install photo screenshot is actually later on in the video after installing the pedals when it talks about ‘optional’ utilization of the torque wrench.)

  21. Chris Horsfield

    It is going to be interesting to see how the other manufacturers respond with stiffer price competition.

  22. Jim

    As always, great early review, Ray. Thanks.

    Curious if there’s any indication these might be offered in SPD-SL cleats at any point. I’ve heard, anecdotally, that the reason there is no SPD-SL-based power meter (well, aside from that Garmin retrofit kit that requires a very specific type of Ultegra pedals) has to do with patents. But I haven’t been able to find definitive proof of that—just the occasional rumor.

    So, any possibility these might eventually be available in SPD-SL cleats?

    • Zosim

      I’d guess it’s possible but it’s never once been mentioned in the whole project. Given there are only factory issued Look compatible PM pedals out there I’d guess there is a licensing challenge either because Shimano want to be first or just don’t want pedal PMs on their system at the moment.

    • Yeah, I was looking for the exact SPD-SL patent, but not having much luck finding it either. I can easily find the SPD patent (link to patents.google.com)

    • Lukman

      I thought SPD SL patent expired in 2019…

    • usr

      link to patents.google.com

      But the specifics about why some are licenced like crazy (SPD, Keo) while the other is not (SPD-SL) remains a mystery to the uninitiated.

    • Bummer, 2025 by the looks of it. But hey, at least the 2019 expiry of the SPD MTB mountain is a done deal!

      As for licensing, yeah, Shimano has always been weird there. I can see why they’d want to minimize power meters in this space to in theory sell their own products.

    • Lukas D.

      Actually the IQ2-Website says “SPD-SL compatible”:

    • Yup, incorrect. Unfortunate for anyone who buys one and is expecting that. 100% used my Look KEO cleats on this one (I haven’t had a pair of cycling shoes with SPD-SL in probably 5-6 years, though I have some cleats on-hand just in case…).

    • Toby

      Ah, I thought this was SPD-SL? The website says the road pedals are SPD-SL compatible?

      link to iqsquare.com

    • Toby

      Having been an early backer and then dropping out – which in hind sight was a very good decision. I’m really happy to see that IQ2 seem to have produced a decent product.

      Although having watched this review and checking their website, it seems some of their website details are out of date:

      1) Claims the road pedals are SPD-SL compatible but neither Ray’s review nor anyone in the forum seems to agree with this?
      2) Their website only refers to ANT+ connections but Ray’s review clearly shows an iPhone connecting via BT (unless iPhones secretly allow ANT+ 🤣)

      So unmaintained website, 2 year delayed Kickstarter, one decent initial review from Ray….I think I will wait for Ray’s full review before even having another think about this.

      However if that review is good then IQ2 have certainly made a compelling power meter that is worthy of at least a consideration given its price!

    • Now y’all have me pondering…

      I can’t imagine my Keo cleats would ever work with an SPD-SL pedal, even in the most rough shape. Maybe I’m wrong, but I don’t think that’s technically possible?

      Either way, I’ll try it in the morning (to see if a SPD-SL cleat fits in) when I’m at the office. That’d be mind blowing if true.

    • Ok, I checked this morning – first thing before evening putting down a bag. I stuck on a brand new pair of SPD-SL cleats onto my shoes and tried clicking in. No love.

      I then dorked with a few things, still no love.

      Then I texted IQ2 to see if I was crazy and somehow did 3 rides with LOOK KEO cleats without problem, or if their website showing SPD-SL was wrong. As expected, the website was wrong. It’s since been fixed. 🙂

    • Clemens

      They fixed it for the road pedal…but not for the MTB pedal…

    • Clemens

      MTB is still wrong, saying SPD-SL instead of SPD

  23. Ismo

    Thank you for the great post.

    What cleats did you use for testing the IQ2 pedals? I am just wondering how the pedals will work with generic Look type cleats, for example with the Vector 3 cleats (ARC R2). I once discussed the issue with the IQ2 support, but at that point they did not give very clear answer.

  24. S. Kommeren

    Thanks so much Ray! Glad to see it looks okay. Curious what the timeline for delivery will be now.

  25. Pavel Vishnyakov

    Finally!
    I thought that due to the current mess it will be delayed again (the pedals, not the post)

  26. Ming-Ko Sun

    Great, can’t wait for the shipment.

  27. Ryan

    Hi Ray,

    Thanks as usual for your great work.
    This looks good and I think I may take the plunge on a preorder.
    Just one question – they offer the choice of side on a single power set which is quite unique.

    With my right leg being more dominant, would it make sense to order a right hand powered pedal to help me more accurately gauge effort against what I put out on the kickr?

    I have no exact figures on how much stronger my right leg is and it may be trivial overall, but just thought the question was worth asking when the choice is available.

  28. WorkOnSunday

    design change , yes, but apart from Assimo hack, these will be the first SPD mtb pedal based PM. nice! now get them shipped!

    PS: im a backer and i was slightly concerned when they proposed design change but as long as my original intended use is fulfilled, im ok with that.

    • First SPD mountain bike pedals started shipping from SRM last week: link to dcrainmaker.com

      So far my on and off-road data is looking solid.

    • PeterF

      I wonder how long that 999 euro price tag on the SRM pedals lasts if/when the IQ2 SPD pedals come available at 1/3 of that price. Given that the technical details for the SPD version is rather lacking at the moment I suspect IQ2 will focus first on their road pedals.

  29. Robin Drummond

    So many things could be and have been said about iq2 over the last two years but they basically performed much as you originally cautioned us about.
    Let’s hope the switch to full scale production is easier than the last 24 months.
    Nice to see that it looks as though they may have pulled off the design process let’s just wait to see if the products actually follow.
    Thanks Ray, you are someone that I trust when they express their opinion on a cycling subject

  30. Robert Markle

    One thing that really grinds my gears is scrolling through a ridiculously wordy article only to find it lacking the most important information, the price!

  31. Steven

    Thx for the video.
    I think the difference in weight might be the battery.
    If yo install it begore weighing, you probably end up with identical weights.

    Kind regards
    Steven

  32. Charlie Elsey

    re spd-sl IQ2 originally tried to do a shimano-style setup when it was the pod between pedal and crank, then with an spd-sl style pedal – shimano said NO in no uncertain terms

  33. John Cross

    DC Rainmaker, are expecting to receive a dual-sided version as well? Thanks.

  34. Ryan

    Just preordered a right hand single sided set.
    Ray’s preview gave me enough confidence that a solid product is coming!

    Thanks as usual Ray for all your hard work.

    • JD

      I didn’t read more into this than — looks okay (so far) after two rides.
      Hope things turn out well with the in-depth review. Then I might consider a purchase if MTB model is made available and it passes the same tests.

  35. Ironguy

    I unfortunately backed this terrible company for their original design with the hopes of using my speedplay pedals. Based on their original Fall delivery timeline, I thought it would fit my Spring/Summer 2019 schedule. Obviously they blew passed that as mentioned by Ray. I have no intention of using their road pedals for both sides and if anyone in US is interested in them please reach out to me.

    • John Cross

      Ironguy, I am disappointed as you are with a 2x sets type of speculative investment. I will still be surprised when they show up, though I am actually impressed with the company taking cost out (a current pedal design, no titanium, etc.) and reducing their time to market potential by changing design philosophy (using the existing pedal platform likely), and last but not least, actually driving forward to deliver a product. The latter does not always happen.

      We have a significant investment in SpeedPlay pedals (I think 5 or 6 pairs between road, track and cx bikes) and Wahoo (2x kickrs, climb, headwind, etc.). I did find some hope for the future in the following article, but I’ve not heard any updates from Wahoo.

      link to dcrainmaker.com

      Anyone who’s got an update on that would be great! This acquisition was made 9.24.2019, so we’re past the 6 month mark.

    • Tom

      Ironguy, how do we swap contact info?

    • Ironguy

      Tom, you can send me an email at sinanram@yahoo.com

    • Bill O'Hara

      I would be interested in a deal with you. What are your terms ?

  36. The Real Bob

    Having a really tedious install process, being late to market, not good. SRM starting to ship, although overpriced, may be the nail in the coffin for these.

    I am not sure I would buy these, even at half price of the srms. They may have a small window to undercut SRM, but they can’t wait a year to start shipping and they need to clean up that install. They need to be screw on and done.

    IF Favero comes out with SPD pedals I think this company is in big trouble because Favero has a pretty good brand name now.

    Pedal power meters are really hard to get right. Garmin hasn’t done it yet with the vector 3, end cap number 3 is out and it looks like those don’t fix the problems either.

    • Dan

      Well they’re one-quarter of the price of the SRMs. That’s a solid deal.

    • rgw

      Yeah, at this price the SRM’s shouldn’t even be in the conversation, even if they’re incredibly good and these are only decent. IQ2 will be screwed if Favero release a SPD pedal or find a way to reduce the price of their product as they have a far better reputation, but otherwise I can see these being a success if they manage to scale up their manufacturing without their quality suffering and maintain good QA/QC standards. They’re targeting the large portion of the market that’s very reluctant to spend the $400 on the Assioma Uno’s, so SRM’s $1199 entry is irrelevant. Anybody who’d even entertain the thought of buying the SRM’s wouldn’t care about these things, and trying to compare them is unreasonable considering the price difference is literally the cost of a decent entry level bike.

  37. KG

    I’ll be selling mine (I got a pair) when we “finally” get them as pedals are not what I want. I have a pedal sponsor. We bought into a crank arm monitor. Total bait & switch on this level is not acceptable irrespective of the quality or final result.

  38. Zach

    Regarding Mountain Bike SPD –
    I’m assuming these will be MUCH cheaper than the SRM X-Power.
    However the pictures of the IQ2 mountain bike pedals appear that they would not work well in mud or ice/snow, where the SRM appear to have more space for shedding mud/ice. Thoughts?

    Regarding swapping between bikes – would you feel comfortable having 1 pair of MTB pedals and swapping them between 5 bikes constantly? Would you still grease the threads, or just go in dry, and check the tension before each ride? (I’d give them a quick turn out and in every few weeks to prevent the thread metal from bonding).

    As a background on why I’m looking into these – I have 5 bikes with Stages (both road-bikes have Stages L/R). It’s been a complete nightmare of RMAs, un-linking, botched firmware updates, and being unsure if the Right side is making the readings worse than left only, let alone provideing accurate L/R balance which is why I bought them,( after seeing gplama’s videos. ) Honestly I think the resale value of shimano cranks went down a lot after these findings, and it’s probably not worth my time to sell them on ebay and buy normal shimano cranks without power. I’d likely not make much money back.
    I guess my only other option would be to find someone to LOAN me a pair of pedal based power meters to see how bad the shimano R8000 right cranks (Stages Gen3) actually read on my particular bikes.

  39. edgardo reyes

    Do they come with cleats? If no, what cleats are compatible?

  40. Peter

    How do these compare to the FAVERO ASSIOMA pedals based on your review and assessment?

  41. Darren Whight

    Any news on whether the pedals support oval chainrings? I know the Assioma’s do, think they are the only pedal based PM that does.

  42. Saul_Goodman

    Looks promising. We’ll see when they actually deliver…

  43. Mark

    Hey DC, I was originally thinking the Assioma dual powermeter pedals were the better option, given the review and some posted comments here and elsewhere… but certainly the iQ2 comes in at much more digestible price point… I can imagine (after the wait and see period) this is going to cause other manufacturers to reset their product(s)/price points, no?

    • Only if IQ2 can ramp up production to meaningful market levels (realistically 1,000+ units a week). Otherwise it won’t impact anything.

    • John Cross

      The 1K units per week is insightful. I’ve looked for a market analysis, but haven’t found a graph of all the players. Does the 1K have a source or come from your industry insight?

    • Mark

      Thank you for responding. The iQ2 is intriguing. Looking forward to your future evaluation.

    • John – mostly based on industry insight and knowing what the larger players put out on a weekly basis.

      There’s very little data out there on actual size of the power meter market in terms of units sold per year. Everyone has their own little tidbits and very few people want to share. So it’s like playing a board game trying to collect all the pieces.

      While I have data for most of the majors, the simpler game one has to play in their head is actually the LBS by state game: How many power meters of a particular type in LBS’s in each state sell per week?

      For example would Garmin sell 10 Vector 3 power meters across the entire state of NY in a week so that you can relatively easily find them on peoples bikes around you (which is only bikes you see)? No, they’d sell more. And then once you decide on a reasonable number you can roughly multiply by 50 and figure things out… And of course that ignores the rest of the world.

  44. klaus

    Do you know who produce the Pedal Body?

  45. Matt

    I love that it says “made in Holland”. Legally, there is no such thing as Holland, it is a used by many interchangeable with The Netherlands which is the proper name of the country. Pretty sure you need to put the country of original on the package for legal reasons. These whole thing smells amateurism.

  46. John

    Im out.

  47. Zoli66

    Hi Ray,
    thanx for the first video of the iq2 unit. My question is what kind of datas does this unit delivers to a Garmin Edge 1030?

  48. Chris Wood

    Thank you for the video on the iqSquare

  49. Andrea

    @Ray
    From your last photo of the pedal is possible to see the ant+ serial of the pedal (1310)?

  50. Michael Westergaard

    When using the IQ2 app is it possible to adjust the slope value of the powermeter?
    To the best of my knowledge this is currently only possible with SRM and Quarq at the moment and it is very useful feature if you use different powermeters on different bikes as you can then adjust them to match each other.

    • No slope adjustment here that I’ve seen yet.

      To be fair, most of the industry is kinda going away from that. The theory now is: Just make the damn things accurate to begin with.

      Essentially the only thing slope adjustments did was compensate inaccurate power meters. However, most companies do allow you to check the calibration using weights. I’m not sure if IQ2 permits that yet.

    • Andrea

      But in your video at 6.45, is it possible to see “Gain”, and 6.51 after the connection “100%”, isn’t this supposed to be used to align with other powermeter output?

    • That’s actually different. In this case it’s in theory used to align a left/right foot imbalance (and the usually incorrect assumption those are static). It can also (more appropriately) be used when someone uses two different crank lengths (however, that’s not yet applicable here).

      Some people might use that to adjust for accuracy, but honestly, that’s super rare.

    • Michael Westergaard

      Ok, do you know how this is supposed to be used? If you set both the right and left pedal to 100% gain and after some rides discover that your right vs left balance is 48/ 52 are you then supposed to adjust the gain accordingly so you have a higher gain on the right pedal than on the left?

    • Ismo

      I think it is pretty normal to have a minor difference in power output between legs while riding. Usually the difference is not a static value, but can change between the rides. For that reason it is usually not adjusted.

  51. Alistair gifford-moore

    Thanks for the quick review and we home the co dose will in scaling up soon.

  52. Dennis

    Thanks for that. The price is amazing, so definitely interesting if it holds up to full scrutiny.

    A bit of a worry is the low IP rating (IP54). IPx4 is only splash protection, which seems quite low for pedals bound to get hard hits of water from the front tire.

    • Ismo

      That is exactly what I have been thinking. It ride quite regularly in the rain and pedals that cannot handle that are not suitable for me. For example, vector 3 is rated IPx7.

    • Andrea

      The old model was rated IP67, IP54 It is a very low value, maybe a too low for this kind of product, infact even the chinese manufacture rated theire powermeter to IPX6.
      I written for clarification in the kickstarter campaign, hoping for an answer.

    • Zach

      Yeah that definitely won’t do for mountain biking or adventure races. A lot of gravel riding requires stream crossings and heavy rain. Was REALLY looking forward to the IQ2 mountain version after seeing the $1200 US pricetag on the SRM X-Power. After seeing the prototype pictures of the IQ2 SPD mountain pedals, I’m wondering how they would shed mud or ice. Honestly I’ll probably just sell my stages LR road cranks, and L only mountain cranks and go without power for a couple years and revisit when there are more options for mountain pedals.

    • Dennis

      I wrote their support, and this is the reply I got:
      “Thanks for tthe interest in our power meters. Over the past months we’ve tested the power meter in rain and rode through puddles of water on many occasions without any issues.

      Furthermore, our power meter comes with a 2-year warranty. In case your power meter is faulty or damaged because of our fault, we will replace your power meter.”

      It helps, but I’m not entirely convinced that IPx4 is enough.

  53. Richard Braginton

    Hi is anyone else out in rainmaker land having problems with strava live segments seems very spotty after multiple deleting apps and reinstalling with my garmin edge 520 plus and iPhone took it out for a ride till the last new starred segment lit up and it was totally different to the old screen very confusing, does anyone know what’s going on at strava…… does strava know what’s going on at strava!!!!!!

  54. Ciaran Johnson

    Great review, I have been watching these for a couple of years, I didn’t take a punt at the time, but very interested after seeing your review. My only question is, will they be compatible with a Hammerhead Karoo. The specs say they should, but neither Hammerhead or IQ want to 100% commit. I was wondering if you still had your test Karoo to see if they work together please while you are continuing your tests.

  55. I’m thinking why are Polar’s latest flagships Vantage M, V and Grit X missing here – link to iqsquare.com , even when those itelf declare them to be fully compatible:
    “Sensors
    Compatible with all standard BLE heart rate sensors and running cadence and power sensors as well as cycling speed, cadence and power sensors.”

    • That list appears to be written prior to any of those devices coming out (likely from the Kickstarter days). You’ll notice the Edge 530/830 are missing for example, as is the Fenix 5 Plus & 6 series.

    • Ciaran Johnson

      Do you think they should work with the Karoo, nothing indicates that they wont work.

    • I would expect no issues there.

    • Ciaran Johnson

      Thanks, both Hammerhead and IQ2 have said the same, but didn’t want to commit until the pedals were tested with the computer.

    • JD

      If ANT+ is a standard can’t every GPS brand simply say “any ANT+ device is supported”?
      Is BLE the problem child?

    • There’s different profiles, or device types, so one has to support those. For example power meters are different than heart rate sensors, which are different than cadence sensors, which are different than radar sensors, and so on.

      Repeat the whole thing for Bluetooth Smart.

    • JD

      So can a manufacturer simply say “this device supports any ANT+ power meter” or do they have to verify every single brand and model power meter in order to claim compatibility?

    • They verify against the spec. In fact, they can send in a device to ANT+ and they’ll perform verification that it meets the spec (not that it’s accurate, just that it properly conforms to the communication standards).

      Most reputable companies do this for almost all products. Sometimes there’s obvious delays in getting things to ANT+ or such, but for the most part almost every company in the space will send things over to get certified: link to thisisant.com

      Also note that this doesn’t mean a product supports every feature within a given type. For example, power meters (like Vector or Assioma pedals) can support Cycling Dynamics, which is essentially a subset of the power meter spec now. So a device could get certified on the basics, but not support extended features. The Pioneer power meter is a good example of that. It’s certified on ANT+ for all the basics, but when it comes to cycling dynamics, they don’t do that and instead do their own thing.

      For Bluetooth, it’s vaguely the same except almost nobody sends in their devices for sport-purposes to get certified because its crazy expensive. I think Polar did for a few because they were on the board at the time. I haven’t looked in years. Also, the Bluetooth Power Meter spec is a bit of a disaster. Companies make it work now, but it’s mostly because through everyoe’s trial and error on how to make it work. It’s more of an issue for dual-sided devices than single-sided ones.

      The overwhelming consensus of the power meter/bike computer industry is always use ANT+ for pairing your power meter. For things like heart rate, it doesn’t matter much – that spec is pretty clean on BT.

    • Maiko

      So they made the compatible list before they had their final product ready and it’s firmware ready? Sounds problematic…

      The reason i’m (pre)worried, is that as Vantage V owner i would like to have IQ2 power meter sensor without need to have separate cycling computer, but when they (IQ2 or Polar) doesn’t declare the tested comtability, i can’t be sure.

      Polar has allready proved that, their general feature declaration on Vantage V website is worthless, when their after-sales support narrows the supported power meters list from “all” to the list of 11 devices only:
      according to link to trainerroad.com instead of *all BT power meters* they consider compatible only devices listed on link to support.polar.com

      That’s why, Ray, if possible, please test it during your full review.

    • Like any Kickstarter project, a million people ask the question “Is this compatible with my X, Y, and Z?” And so they put together a list, based on devices out at the time, and compatibility. Seems super-reasonable to be honest.

      There’s a large pile of things all of us can fault IQ2 for, but this is absolutely not one of those things to give them grief about right now (we could give them grief for not updating the list, but honestly I’d rather them spending time to workout the bugs).

      I took the IQ2 pedals off my main road-bike for a bit to test other things for now (I want to see them start shipping out to the masses before I spend a bunch of time deep-diving into testing), but I’ll mount them to something and see if the Vantage V can pair up. Cheers!

    • Ciaran Johnson

      Would you be able to link them up to the Karoo at the same time please to test it can support the pedals. I am sure it will be ok.

    • Clemens

      Yeah don’t give them any publicity until they ship their PMs to backers/people who preordered.
      We had no update for the last 2 weeks…They have become quiet again despite their last promising update saying to produce hundreds of PMs last week and thousands from this week on, and this silence happended before (always when something went wrong)

      I also hope that GPLama waits until at least 100 backers got their PMs, or at least give the strong recommendation to wait to buy them until they are actually delivered.

  56. Daniel

    So, general question, how can we know comparing 3 or 4 powermeters which is more accurate? Three of them could give us same values and the other 10 watts different. But, we can’t say that this last is not accurate.

    We need a calibration certificate from a national accredited laboratory, according to official standars. And this is something that no company (SRM, Stages, Powertap, Pioneer, etc.) provides. How they calibrate that powermeter, and its value of correction, tolerance, deviation, uncertainty. Without that data, we can’t know which is accurate and which is not. Also, five powermeters from same company and same model will never give same results.

    I understand the purpose of comparing 3 or 4 of them, but people should not take it into account in terms of good/bad accuracy.

    • Paul S.

      Here’s the problem, your “nationally accredited lab” is most likely going to be testing indoors on a dynamometer or something similar, not outdoors in the real world. Because that’s the whole problem: how do you measure power outdoors in the real world under real conditions? If the lab had some better, more accurate way of doing that that wouldn’t otherwise interfere with the ride, then what you’re suggesting would be feasible. But testing indoors (which as I understand, most power meter companies already do) wouldn’t provide much. Testing several meters at once (all of which claim to measure the same thing) seems a much more practical approach and one more likely to discover flaws with particular meters.

  57. Ryan

    Just got a reply from IQ about Oval Chainring compatibility:

    “The iQsquare power meter has not been tested with oval chainrings yet. Because of the oval chainring, the angular speed of the crank is not constant during a revolution and we need to measure micro-cadence to be able to calculate the power with oval chainrings accurately.

    We want to support oval chainrings in the future, but we cannot promise it is supported at the time of the release of the first power meters”

    I’ve preordered the pedals, but have now just installed absoluteblack oval chainrings on my bike…..unsure whether to cancel my order or not. Would the figures be that different? (I would be comparing them to kickr figures purely for my own training).

    If they were close enough I guess that would be ok – I’m not a racer and I suppose as long as they were constant, reliable figures I would at least be able to compare all outside rides together if nothing else.

  58. Ben Lytle

    Hey DC, what are your thoughts on putting this on a spin bike? Do you think these would give you a good result for that? I really want to get that set up with Zwift or something like that.

    Thanks,
    Ben

    • Clemens

      First of all wait until they are available…there was no KS update the last weeks…this “no news” thing we had before.

  59. Jerome

    SO who received one… according to last email they are shipping some…
    I was definitely in the early backers and still nothing so far 🙂

  60. PAUL CULLEN

    So the question is a do I buy a dual set of the iQ2 or the Favero Assimoa uno?

    • Well, Favero Assioma Duo is mostly shipping today (minus any minor stockage issues due to COVID19), and has been validated and tested for years.

      IQ2 doesn’t yet have a dual-sided setup ready. It could be soon, but they said they’re going to focus on single-sided first.

  61. Daniel

    It breaks my heart reading the comments from May, after Ray’s review. If only the loyal backers knew they would be in for further delays and more unknown timescales (4/June update on their Kickstarter page….)

    Mind you if you are a backer you are used to it by now.

    I hope IQ2 deliver the pedals during 2020. Sounds like the lucky single sided road pedal backers may get it, but everyone else…..

    • I think people may be underestimating points #4/#5 in my opening section of this post. Or the last few lines of the post.

      I remain firm those are substantial points that will likely drag on for some time.

    • John Cross

      Amen. As an early investor in many projects including myself! Nos. 4 & 5 are salient, Ray.

  62. Vinnie

    Just took the plunge and pre ordered. Customer service was extremely responsive via EM this morning and mentioned the DUOs if ordered today would ship early July. I’ll take that gamble paying a 200+ premium to get the Assiomas.

  63. Vincent

    Thanks for the review. I am really looking forward to the full in-depth review, and will base my decision whether or not to buy on it. Do you have any indication of when this review will air? Thanks!

    • I’m kinda waiting to see how things settle on units people are receiving. Mostly because as noted in the intro, I’m not super confident the unit I have will be an exact representation of the units everyone else has.

      I’d really like to wait until they’ve shipped a few hundred units, and then get one of those to see how well they work.

      Which isn’t a slight on IQ2, every power meter company learns a lot in manufacturing. I think it’s just harder for IQ2 because they’re under far more pressure timeline wise to ship those early units than not.

  64. Yeahhhh…..might cancel my order and go with the Assioma duo’s. I only placed my order 3 weeks ago for IQ², and I already don’t enjoy this rollercoaster. The ONLY reason I even placed an order was because “if you buy now, we’ll be shipping to you in June”.
    They don’t even offer any usable information in their updates. But then again, maybe they don’t even know themselves. At this point, unfortunately to say, but Favero is 100% worth the extra couple hundred dollars. I think IQ² needs to work on their optimistic updates and be realistic. Wouldn’t it be better to say a later date and deliver goods before that date, as opposed to saying an earlier date and have only delivered a grand total of 3 units by that date?

    • Nevermind, favero website says “you’ll be able to compete your purchase in 60 days when we have it in stock”. Well, poop.

    • Vinnie

      Good luck finding them for under 800 for the duos. Price gouging due to lack of availability. Customer service said yesterday morning early July shipping. Mentally I’m preparing (praying) for August

  65. stefano

    Did you mean that the version in you possession was single side? Because on IQ site the double-leg version is available.

  66. JD

    Data accuracy looks very good for a first time product, but I see potential Achilles heel issues you should cover in your in-depth review.
    – bearings design (how robust; can they be serviced?)
    – IP54 rating (never hose down your pedals?)
    – plastic end cap (damage from hex wrenching, bad cornering, or crash worthiness?)

    I guess we’ll know soon enough after the first hundred early backers gets theirs. 🙂

  67. Steffen Vollstädt

    Awesome article about your testing. Thanks.
    After hearing almost nothing from IQ2 since my order in May2019 – this makes me feel much better:-)
    I also just read your blog about Polar devices using Ant+. Did you test-ride the IQ2 pedals only with your Garmin? Do you know by chance if there will be a potential connection possibility between the pedals and a Polar Vantage V?

    Keep on riding!
    Regards, Steffen

  68. Leighanna

    Thanks for the review. I’ve been exploring power meter pedals for my Peloton as it kind of enrages me that a $2500 bike can’t figure out how to send output real-time to my Fenix 6s. Not sure I want to invest $500+ in Vectors/P2s as someday I should be able to go to my gym again…ha.

    Is there any reason to expect these wouldn’t be compatible with a Peloton?

  69. Ian

    Thanks very much for the ‘initial impressions review’. I appreciate the time that takes. Oh and I love the cycle routes you get to test on.

    I’ve never been able to afford/justify a power meter so I’ve stayed with TrainerRoad’s Virtual power which is great indoors but leaves rather on my own outside.

    I really like the pricing of these units so I’m very interested to see how these go, particularly how reliable they are once mass production and shipping starts.

  70. Phil

    In their lastest (late) update, it turns out they havent even started production yet. The three sets delivered to one backer, DCR and GPLama are all hand made – they even have to change the PCB design. On 29th June they were still claiming that they would deliver to all backers in June. When they missed that it was first week of July. It now turns out they have at least an 11 week lead time as shown in the last update, so the earlier promise dates were either deliberately misleading or down to incompetence (if you have an 11 week lead time and you have one day until your deadline you know you are going to miss it). They have now gone back into the mode where they do not respond (the last facebook post was 9th May). I feel this project has finally failed. I dont mind if I loose my money if they tried valiantly and failed, but the poor comminication is an insult to us backers. I have tried reaching to to Keejan directly to ask him to do some sort of webcast to talk trhough the project, but have had no response.

    • Pedro L

      Phil, perhaps DC can respond to your post? He lives close by IQ2 and given his unwavering commitment to IQ2 think he would be only too happy to respond to your concerns. I am surprised he hasn’t already done so. As DC said at the outset, “Meeting with the founder Keesjan Klant was without question interesting. He’s part Elon Musk and part Dr. Emmett Brown from Back To the Future. I have zero question in my mind he’ll be able to pull this off. He and his team are certainly smart enough – and he’s got a long resume of far greater and more complex engineering projects to work from.
      So with zero question on this mind that Keesjan will deliver I am sure he will be able to allay your concerns.

    • Hi Pedro-

      I already addressed this point in the opening section of this post, and the summary (and in the video). Specifically stating I was lacking confidence in whether what I received was considered final, given it had already been changed once. Not to mention, I specifically stated I have no idea (or confidence) in the timelines.

      I don’t have any unwavering commitment there. Which, mostly seems to be the opposite of your unwavering commitment to like trolling on the subject over the years, specifically of my initial thoughts on meeting with the CEO. Which, btw, are still valid. He pulled off making a power meter. That’s done. Whether he can scale it remains to be seen. Though, even that seems pretty likely at this point – just not in the timeframes people want.

      Which, is also what I’ve said repeatedly about IQ2, and you’ve repeatedly ignored – every time you like to quote me. In fact, that’s actually the next line that you decided to omit from the quote:

      “But, like Elon Musk, I suspect he’s underestimating the difficulties in this product and the timelines involved. There’s a long trail of companies that have tried and failed to develop power meters.”

      Which was then followed by:

      “Like Elon – he’ll get there, and the product will likely be great in the end. But, it probably just won’t happen when you think it will.”

      So again, I’ll ask – if you’re gonna quote me, at least don’t do it selectively.

      Cheers.

  71. Sven

    I’m currently seriously considering getting new pedal-based power meters. Coming from the SPD faction I (naturally?) had my eyes on the new SRM X-Power (the beast of habit) but haven’t yet seen any tests or reviews. Apart from that their latest pricing spike of course also pretty much kicked them out of contention for me. That said, the Favero Assioma Duo now appear to be my top choice. As these – as well as the Garmin Vector 3 are now “already” a bit longer on the market I was, however, kinda wondering whether there might already be new things in the pipeline I haven’t yeard heard of. Are you aware of any plans by Garmin or Favero to bring out new generations in the near future?

  72. johnny

    are these available to gen pop?
    should I buy one and what’s their warranty?

  73. Phil W

    It has all gone quiet again and they have stopped answering questions (even on messenger). The promise to ship to all backers by the end of June became July then Q3. It then turns out they haven’t mass produced any (despite an advertising campaign stating mass production and shipping has started). They claim to have hand-shipped 19 single sided PMs (but only one person on kickstarter can confirm they have them). They said they would make 250 the next week, but now won’t confirm if that happened/how many.They also state they need to fine tune the pcb design.

    • LittleSaul

      Right now it doesn’t look promising at all. Waiting for the mountain bike version…

    • Zach

      Their latest facebook post is MONTHS ago where they hand delivered ONE power meter and stated they are shipping and ‘out in the wild’. Since they they have began ignoring all questions and comments. This is a shame. I finally had to order some new XT pedals after waiting and waiting for these, so that counts me out….I won’t ever consider doing business with IQ2. They seem to be doing a lot of harm to their brand name at this point. If they were to handle tech issues down the road as poorly as what they are doing now, it doesn’t seem worth the risk.

    • Jan

      I asked them in May if I could switch to mtb version (so I could by Assioma instead and not end up with two road power meters). They discouraged me from switching and said singles were about to ship and duals were in production. Now I asked them again to switch my order to mtb and they said that it’s not possible because the orders are “almost lined up for production” and ignored further questions. I kind of don’t expect anything anymore.

  74. Phil W

    Latest Kickastarter update yesterday (number 65 – 31st Aug 2020) makes it clear you were given a hand-made power meter and that no power meters have yet been made on the production line. So can we trust production power meters (if it ever happens) will get the same accuracy results?

    • When you go from hand-made to automated, they’re two different products in my mind. In most cases, they turn out better – though, not 100% of the time (sometimes the shift to automation is incredibly challenging – we saw that with Brim Brothers years ago).

      As noted in the intro of this post, I was unclear/ensure just how much what I have reflected what people will get. A core reason why I didn’t call it a review, nor will do I do more testing till I have a final production unit.

      Cheers!

    • Phil W

      How is the battery life on your unit? The people who have got some of the 19 deliveries are reporting only 15 hours (link to facebook.com).

    • Joerg Meyer

      Hi.

      IQ2 has stopped all communications and does not refund regular customers.
      If you have any direct contact to them maybe can you just check quickly if they are still…there…?

      Would be a great help for a lot of people who gave them quite a lot of money.

      Thx.

  75. Hendrik

    Seems they are not able to refund money for cancellations, which, to me, shows they are short before failing 🙁

  76. BernieGE

    Hi, Waiting for a dual mtb set, no news since 23.7 where they said september, no answers in messenger nor by email. I hesitate on refund but september is not finished and nothing beat their offer yet : fresh news anyone ?

    • Phil W

      I suggest you have a look at the kickstarter pages (link to kickstarter.com) or their facebook page – but be aware their posts have pretty much stopped. There is also a backers and customers group (link to facebook.com) where we are sharing any information we get.
      We have two confirmed deliveries and it seems the battey only lasts 15 hours. In their last post they confrimed they hadn’t actually started any mass production and the 19 they had hand delivered were all hand made. A number of customers have had paypal refunds bounce. Thye stated single sided road first, then dual then MTB – so far they haven’t made anything but the 19 single sided and no evidence of a working MTB prototype.

    • BernieGE

      Thanks Phil, went to the fb group, let see till end september

  77. Jorge Campos

    I anyone thinks buying this:
    It’s 09/2020 and IQ2 has seized all communication, nothing is being delivered.

    It’s a fraud.

  78. Phil W

    One kickstarter backer has been doing some digging and visited the IQ2 office (link to facebook.com) and found out they have set up another company and tried to start kickstarter funding (link to kickstarter.com). Very concerned they are trying to start a new venture whilst this one is failing and they are not even talking to us.

  79. Adam

    I’ve found a more recent update.
    Dating 31st Aug.

    Cryptic!
    link to kickstarter.com

  80. Phil Whiffin

    link to youtu.be

    This is a video of their current manufacturing process from the latest kickstarter update (link to kickstarter.com). When they missed the last dedline they kicked it 3 months fdown the road, that three months is up and they have done nothing except stop anwering questions or responding to customer (oh and tried to satrt a new kickstarter campaign – see q-reel).

  81. Steven Michiels

    Dear DC,

    If I understand you review correctly you used also the POLAR Grit X to pair with the IQ square pedals?
    I’m trying to contact IQ square customer service the check if the “new” polar devices (Vantage M,V, Grit X,..) are compatible with these pedals, but they only send me the link to their website. For Polar they only mention V800, V460, v600).

    Thanks for your confirmation.

    • Andrea Buono

      Hi Steven,
      I’m sorry for your problem and I’m sorry but I can’t help you, but I have to highlight
      that someone is getting their own pedals though 🙂
      Can I ask when you got it and where you live?
      Only to understand if IQ2 is doing something or the pedals are from the old batch from a month ago or so.
      Thanks and good luck.

    • For comments on the listed devices, see this section of comments here: link to dcrainmaker.com