Peloton’s Interesting Indoor Cycling Bike Platform


By some stroke of complete and total coincidence, a friend of mine called me last Wednesday morning and asked about the Peloton bike system.  You may remember the company from about 2.5 years ago when they first launched into the market via Kickstarter, ultimately shipping last winter.  At the time, it seemed like a bit of a variant of the super-expensive and well-connected indoor bikes from ProForm (you know, the one that people wear helmets on indoors).  Anyway, my friend was asking me how to compare that against something like an electronic trainer from Tacx or Wahoo.  He’s not a huge cyclist, but more into spin classes.

No more than about 6 minutes later did I randomly stumble past the Peloton booth at CES.  So, I figured I’d get a bit of a demo into what their whole system is.  And surprisingly, I came away impressed.  I say surprisingly because I’m not really into expensive stationary bikes, nor equally expensive paid services.  However, for a very narrow audience, I think this is a spot-on platform.  But first, let’s start at the beginning.

The Peloton Platform:

The first thing you need to know about the Peloton platform is that you’ll need one of their super swanky indoor cycling bikes (technically it’s not called a ‘Spinning bike’, since that term is trademarked, thus, the industry uses ‘indoor cycling’ instead of the less exciting ‘stationary bikes’).  But yes, all of us call them spin bikes, even if they don’t.

In any case, this beast of a bike will set you back $2,000USD.  Or roughly, the price of a mid-range road bike.  Or about 1.5x-2.0x that of a high-end computerized trainer, depending on model.


Now, the specs on the 125lbs bike are impressive.  First up, it includes a 21” 1080p display up there, which seemed pretty beefy.  It’s also WiFi connected, as well as supports Bluetooth (for audio) and ANT+ (for HR straps).  Oh, and both water bottle and dedicated dumbbell holders:


That screen includes speakers, as well as a microphone and camera (but more on that in a moment).

Now the primary draw of this bike is the connected platform, a platform which is both required and pricey at $39/month.  Essentially, everything about this product is pricey, but as I’ll explain in the next section – I think the monthly fee is justifiable.

The platform is all about video content, but not just recorded content – rather, live too.  You’ll sign-in with your profile and see a slew of options on how to get a workout in.  These include viewing any existing recorded spin classes, as well as videos from scenic spots:



They’ve also got random rides, like this celebrity one too.  You could have done this live, as well as now recorded.


But the most interesting piece is the ability to join a spin class live.  For this, there are multiple sessions per day.  I actually waited around in the booth until the next one came on, which at roughly 12 live classes per day, most heavily grouped at fairly logical workout times during the day.  For example, here’s the schedule for today and tomorrow (note that it’s not showing the 6AM Monday class, since it was prior to my screenshot):

image image

And, here’s how it appears on the screen:


Once you launch a class, you’ll see the instructor live.  You’ll also see the other members of the class listed on the right, sorta like a chat window.  You can communicate with them, and even open up a video stream to them if they agree (remember, the camera is in your TV screen).  The quality is HD, and seemed pretty good – though, there were certainly some drops in the connectivity/quality due to the poor WiFi at the convention center.


During the class you’ll hear the instructor’s instructions as well as see various camera shots live of the instructor and others in the class.  And I think that this gets to the main interest point here for me – it’s a live class with real people in it.  When you’re watching the screen, you’re seeing actual humans in a live class in NYC, not just some recorded thing somewhere without others.  When I picked some random 4:30PM live class on a Wednesday, it was showing nearly 130 others logged in at the time into that specific class.  Pretty impressive.


You could tap on anyone (it’s a touchscreen running Android), to see their current metrics.  So here’s some random person that afternoon that I tapped on:


If I tapped to ‘Follow’ her, and then she accepted, I could have also begun a video session with her using the small camera at the top of the screen:


Also note that you can pair a set of Bluetooth headphones to the console as well as just used plugged in ones.


On the unit itself, you’ll see power, pace, speed, distance and other metrics you’d commonly find:


The heart rate field would come from any ANT+ connected HR strap.

These are all then saved to your profile later.  The same profile that’s accessible from the main screen within the class.  So it’s sorta like Strava meets Facebook (there are privacy settings of course), with the ability to video chat while you’re pouring sweat.



The only downside here is that there’s no way yet to actually export/connect any of this data to Strava, or other platforms.  The company says that kind of integration is something they’re looking at – but I didn’t get the impression they had a timeline for that.  Just sorta a ‘Oh, this answer will appease him’.

A Few Final Thoughts:

Now, regular readers know that I’m hardly a fan of stationary bikes or islanded platforms.  Nor of expensive gadgets just for the sake of it.  And in fact, this manages to nail all of those.  With just one exception here: It’s executed very well, and in this case it might be cheaper or easier for a certain segment of the population.

That segment being those that actively go to spin classes.  At $39/month for unlimited virtual classes/videos, it’s undoubtedly cheaper than going to an actual studio numerous times a week.  And in many ways you’re getting a fairly similar experience due to the live connectivity.

Of course, you have to be the type of person that’s really into spinning (or, officially ‘indoor cycling’).  For me, not so much.  But for my friend I mentioned – it actually makes sense.  That’s because he’s unlikely to find much interest in the TrainerRoad or Zwift platforms used on indoor trainers, compared to a structured spin class like this.  Just the way his personality is – and that’s great.  Of course, it is more expensive.  Though less so if you’re paying a lot for spin classes each month.

I also think the company is missing out on a huge segment of doing something similar for those with regular trainers though through their subscription service and a laptop/tablet/computer (Update: You can do this on their iPad app for $13/month).  Undoubtedly their main goal is to get thousands upon thousands of people paying $39/month for the service.  The actual hardware probably isn’t a huge money-maker for them comparatively.  And the metrics like speed and HR don’t really matter to the platform anyway.  Though I believe they should be offering a way for folks to export that data to 3rd parties.

With that – thanks for reading!

Don’t forget to check out all of the DCR CES 2016 coverage, as well as a slew of updates that were only seen on Twitter.  It was a crazy busy week!

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked.
If you would like a profile picture, simply register at Gravatar, which works here on DCR and across the web.


 Notify me of followup comments via e-mail.

You can click here to Subscribe without commenting

Add a picture


  1. Chris Capoccia

    some interesting criticisms of the equipment at http://peloton-bike.com

    but for someone who really likes spinning classes and doesn’t plan on riding outdoors it might work out fine.

    also, the peloton bike calculates power using a dyno which they say can vary 10% between bikes link to support.pelotoncycle.com

    • Interesting first link, but that seems* an awful lot like a competitive dealer that setup a one-page site to draw you to buy one of their bikes (vs the Peloton). In fact, some of the supposed ‘points’ they bring up are pretty shallow – such as needing cycling shoes. C’mon, duh? (You can use any compatible shoes you want) And having to pay tax? Yes my friends, that’s how it works.

      *And by ‘seems’, I mean it is, as the link at the top of the page indicates.

  2. Jimmy Stevenson

    Thanks for the post. As always, you gave some nice details that can’t be found on the company’s website.

    I started seeing a ton of commercials for this over the weekend. It was definitely intriguing enough that I did some research. The Peloton cycle costs more than my tri bike, so I don’t think I’ll be dropping my cash anytime soon (Unless I hit that 1.3 Billion Powerball jackpot). But the scenic views option is one that might sell my father in-law on buying an “indoor cycle.”

    • For “scenic views option” your father in-law could be way better of with existing software and videos that is capable of working with variety trainers with wide price spectrum.

      Disclaimer: we are a vendor of such software and videos. Well trainers as well but our trainer is even more expensive then Peloton

    • Jimmy Stevenson

      Thanks Veloreality. I started looking into a few options for him (although, to be honest I haven’t done much because he is a grown man who can do his own research!). I will give him your site information along with the peloton info I sent him yesterday.

  3. Michael Fiola

    Thanks for the post Ray. I have been curious about these. I am an avid outdoor rider/racer but like to do my intense interval sessions in a control indoor environment. (I unfortunately don’t live where it’s possible to have an uninterrupted steady gradient for miles, which would be perfect.)

    I use a trainer now, but I would actually like a dedicated high quality stationary bike. It would need to have magnetic and responsive resistance, true power meter, and road bike-like geometry. The new bike from Stages is the closes I’ve seen, but they missed on the geometry for smaller riders.

    • Tim Grose

      Have you checked out link to wattbike.com
      They have some Wattbike Pro ones at the gym I goto and have even managed to hook it up with Zwift and pair power, cadence and speed/distance with Garmin devices.

    • Michael Fiola

      Thanks Tim Grose. I’m familiar Wattbikes and understand they are pretty impressive. Unfortunately I’ve never actually seen one in the US.

  4. Chris Lawrence

    Oddly enough, Pelaton seems to have an app that streams the live or on-demand classes to your iOS devices for 12.99 a month, with a lower cost drop in option. A solid spinner bike is around $1000, so … Seems like they are cannibalizing their own market. I suppose your lose the interactive nature somewhat… I may try a class on a spin bike at the gym and see how it is

  5. gabe

    Anyone else want to pay to see Ray cycle/dance with some 1 pound dumbells?

  6. Gear Fisher


    I actually bought a Peloton for my wife for Christmas this year, and I’ve used it myself 3 times now. Normally I don’t chime in on product reviews, but I’m comfortable with this one. I’ll sum it up quickly since I think I can represent the mind of the endurance athlete (most of your readers) and for whom this bike was meant for (not them). It’s really made for discriminating folks that want an engaging, motivating piece of equipment that you’ll enjoy using to workout, but don’t want to futz with bike setups, computers and gizmos. Plug it in, start pedaling. It’s always there waiting for you and there’s a person in that screen telling you what to do. Aha! Just like a spin class.

    The software platform is very solid, and it’s fun to see other people as you workout. I’ve done two classes and one scenic ride around Banff. The scenic ride is cool because it doesn’t just stick to roads. It follows trails, roads, jumps to other roads and keeps things interesting. The video is not synced to your effort, so it plays along at one speed no matter how hard you pedal.

    The bike does capture a lot of data and I’ve paired my Wahoo heartrate monitor to it, but I guarantee you the power reading is not accurate. How? Because at a full sprint I put out 500w on this bike, vs 1100 with my SRM on the road. Pushing hard, I barely get it over 200w. It reads low, but for the crowd it’s meant for? who cares. Oh, except, all the leaderboards are based on comparing kilojoules between class participants, which is weird because it is strongly biased toward big fat guys like me and not normalized at all. Oh well, it’s still a great motivator to see yourself move up or down on the leaderboard as you ride along with other class participants.

    The equipment is very well made, solid and seems of high quality. The bike itself is silent, not quiet, I mean literally silent, a very nice feature. However, it is a “spin” bike, that is, the cranks have no freewheel, which is very weird to get used to for a road cyclist like me, and in many ways, I think detrimental to a serious cyclist’s pedal stroke, but I’m not hear to debate that, just pointing it out. The Q-factor is good, much narrower and more like a real bike than many spin bikes I’ve used.

    The screen is great, and the touch based interface is super easy to use. It supports multiple users and keeps track of your workouts to view stats over time. The live stream classes are really well done, and there is something engaging about following along during a live class with the instructor cussing at you now and then. They will even call you out by name occasionally. For recorded sessions, you still compete with the leaderboard of the group that did the class in real-time. It’s very motivating (even if I do feel like I’m cheating since it’s all based on kj).

    Bottom line, I think the bike is really meant for people looking to get some good exercise, not for people looking to train. Leave that to the Zwift and Trainer Road folks. This is a well done “in your home spin class” on a piece of quality equipment that requires almost zero fuss. Also, the bike is more like $3,000 by the time you pay tax, delivery & setup fee, get the accessories and pre-pay for 1 year of classes.

    I’d recommend it to anyone, but I still like riding my own bike, on a KICKR with Zwift or Trainer Road. That said, because the Peloton is just always there and ready, I’ve used it more in the last couple months.

    I sure wish they would allow exporting the data…

    • Dan

      Gear you hit the exact points that I keyed off on when buying the Peloton. I strongly considered using the iPad app with AirPlay to get it to a TV, but ultimately decided against it. Although I don’t mind messing with technology, my spouse prefers things that work right the first time and require no fuss.

      We haven’t taken delivery yet, but your comments make me feel good about our decision. Thanks for posting.

  7. Sam Bell

    My wife wanted it for Christmas last year. I put my Vector pedals on it, zip-tied a Garmin Speed Sensor on it, and use it just fine with Zwift!. I just wish Zwift would work on the screen! Power is never the same between the two, although it can have similar max power from time to time. Usually varies by about 10-20 watts with the Peloton on the higher side. After a year of use, we’ll be canceling our gym membership as we’re both content to do our indoor workouts on the bike.

    • Neil

      I have a Peloton as well that my wife and I both use, so this piqued my interest. Curious what sensor you used and how you attached it to the Peloton? Thanks!

    • Sam Bell

      I’ve had a lot of trial and error with attaching sensors the past 13 months of ownership, determined to have my workout data! I wish they would just permit an export data feature to upload wherever. What have worked have been the Garmin magnet less speed sensor and cadence sensors. The speed sensor does not fit on the front wheel by itself, so I had to level it using cardboard (wrapped in electrical tape for stability) to lie flat. To keep it from falling, I used a combo of rubber band (blue in pic) + cable velcro, secured with a zip tie. That has held up for 5 months now and counting. The speed sensor alone gives me predictable speed and distance ONLY at a fixed resistance. My setting for wheel size is: 1600 mm at a resistance of 50, Wife’s = 1200mm at 33. Once I change resistance higher or lower, both speed and distance are no longer in sync with the Peloton screen data, so this metric is not that important to me. Due to the Vectors, I don’t need the cadence sensors, but they go on just like they would on my outdoor bikes. The Vector pedals install just fine and give me the option to put on my wife’s outside bike during family rides. The Vector’s allow me to use Zwift, which then output rides to Strava with realistic metrics for speed/distance as well as power. They are keeping me from buying a kicker. I would recommend a Peloton to anyone whose wife will allow them to buy a pedal power meter as well!

    • Huntbliss

      I tried this and my speed was way high, couldn’t get it to be in sync with peloton data… There’s got to be an easier at it another speed sensor that works easier/better

  8. Chris Merrill

    Just got the Peloton myself. My wife and I both love it. Gear Fisher really nailed the points. I can’t speak enough for the live classes. That leaderboard they have is awesome. It’s just different than seeing those avatars pass by me or me by them in Zwift.

  9. Scott E

    I did find it humorous when the cost was cited as being high when in comparison adding up my carbon Di2 road bike and Tacx trainer greatly exceeds the sum total, including the monthly subscription fee for a year. The further north I keep moving the more viable an indoor spin bike looks 😉

  10. David

    Ray, I’m not sure if you were aware but Peloton has an iPad app that gives you full HD quality access to all their live and recorded classes for $13 a month. My wife AirPlay’s it from the iPad to the TV on the wall in front of our spin bike (not the Peloton bike). You of course don’t get the metrics or social aspect but classes are top notch and similar to what you would get in a much more expensive gym full of bikes that aren’t hooked up to metrics either. For my wife it works great and is an option if you don’t need the fancy social / metric features of the $2000+ bike.

    • Sweet! I had looked around but couldn’t find any mention of it. Just updated the post.

  11. Patrick Myers

    Ray, correct me if I’m wrong, but when I stopped by the Peleton booth, I thought they said the subscription for the the first year was built into the bike’s purchase price. But maybe I misheard.

    • Interesting, my understanding was actually the opposite – that for the first year you had to buy it, it was part of a 1-year commitment to the service.

      When I kerplunk the bike into my shopping cart online, it seems to match that. :(

  12. LTrain

    They do have an IPAD App… You should really do a class. I was a nay sayer early on, but now it is my go to trainer. Try a 75 minute class with Nicole Meline; you might get hooked.

  13. Steven

    Kind of weird to me that you’re buying a 2,000USD piece of hardware only to be able to use an online platform that costs big money each month as well. And then it reads as if using the online platform is the only thing you can do with the hardware …
    Unless you’re tweaking it (probably beyond warranty terms) as Sam indicated, but then you end up putting yet another display on the attached display to … ah well … I guess I belong to the endurance athlete group this product is not designed for.

    Bought myself a Wahoo Kickr last year, was happy while using TrainerRoad (10USD monthly fee), and even more so when I discovered Zwift. I appreciated the ability to swap and being able to benefit from new developments in the market (potentially by other companies).

    I guess you loose most of your investment if Peloton quits the service (forced or unforced), or changes it significantly in the future requiring one to purchase its next version of hardware …

    • Anders Majland

      The last 4 years my indoor riding has been on a kettler ergometer x7 that i got used.

      Kettlers software let me import my own gpx tracks to ride them again and again or online Ketller world tours 2.0 (link to kettlerworldtours.de) is by current software standard very old looking but the appeal with it is that there is real people out there that also wants win the race. But the numbers of active users does seems high enough. I often end up racing my old pb on a known course. But it does support RealLife videos (RLV) and I’ve also created a few myself.

      If you look at the current indoor race bikes they are not cheap either – ~2000€
      link to sport-tiedje.de

      With a seperate indoor bicycle you don’t have the mess of bringing a dirty road bike indoor. Unfortuntately the kettler protocol is proprietary so zwift/trainerroad etc can’t control it.

      Today I would probably go with a trainer setup with more open interfaces like the Wahoo KICKR

      But again – don’t underestimate the motivational effect of training with/against actual people.

    • Anders Majland

      It looks like http://virtualtraining.eu does support my kettler.

      But it is all about critical mass of users….

    • Aaron

      Some quick back of the napkin math based on the initial purchase price and monthly fee – I could have over 8 years of a regional multi-gym membership – spinning classes included – as well as indoor pool, cardio classes, weights, treadmills, rowing machines, professional trainers, health assessments, yadda yadda. But perhaps it’s a good solution for people that don’t have that option, or want the convenience of not leaving the house.

    • Anders Majland

      Yes – most of my indoor riding are after the youngest of the kids is put to bed. It is hard to beat the convenience of training at home. And the social aspect might be worth it for many. Besides like many others i have half an hour to any gym with classes. Indoor cycling at home does not waste much time. The same from riding outdoors when the weather is tolerable. Luckily i work close to a good pool so i can get a good hour in the water in just over 1,5 from my desk.

  14. Jeff

    Does it have a CSAFE port that one could connect the recently announced Wahoo GEM Retrofit Module to gather/export data?

  15. Fab

    OT again, sorry for that.
    just wondering how much does a booth at 2016 CES cost.

    Thanks for for the great CES coverage

    • Very much depends on size. See this: link to inc.com

      Keep in mind the value used for the floor space cost is much higher than noted on this article (now 3 years old). Space is at a huge premium now.

  16. Martha

    I work long hours during tax season and by the time I can ride my bike it is May – I have an old Johnny G Spinner and I love riding it. I would really use this thanks for the review. Did you get a chance to try out the bike ?

    • Jeff

      I use the Peloton studio in NYC a few times per month and it is by far my favorite spin bike. It is really well made and makes class very enjoyable.

  17. Michael

    They do have an iPhone app as well now that came out a couple weeks ago. They’ve been advertising heavily on Instagram

  18. Casey

    Hmmm, I think I’ll keep an eye on Beverly Hills Craigslist around June. Probably pick one up for under $1K.

  19. Anton

    Seems a bit steep.
    I feel for you Ray if yo feel that 39 bucks a month is cheap.
    My gym membership costs 29.9 euro a month. This price includes all clases… there are 10 live spinning classes a week + option to take a 30-60min virtual class. Also there are like 5 Zumba, 6 Lesmills bodypump, 6 lessmills cxworks and several several other live and virtual classes… and the gym. With wattbike2 bikes, Technogym bikes, Technogym mats and all kind of freeweights and machines. So I’m good.

    • Lucky duck indeed. In most of the places I’ve lived or visited, Spin classes are not included in the monthly membership fees. :(

    • Rafael Pivaral

      LA Fitness and 24 Hour fitness are both decently priced, national (mostly) brands in the US, and both include cycling classes in their memberships at least here in Arizona. The two gyms near me have 3 and 15 classes each week. So, availability seems to vary pretty widely from gym to gym.

    • Anton

      Perhaps it’s a Nordic thing.
      Wisited gyms in Finland (where I live), Sweden and Norway.
      There might be gyms that charge extra for Spinn etc classes. But I haven’t been to one or seen one.

      In my town we have 65 000 inhabitants and 18 gyms… and in general there are a lot of gyms in my country so it might be a case of “charge extra for classes and lose customers”.

      The exclusive gyms might be approx 70 euros a month… but they have solariums and (almost) 24/7 live classes, chilcare services etc etc. In general: however for 29-39 euros a month you can find a gym where there are several free classes. Gyms with no live classes cost somewhete between 10-19 euros a month.

  20. Martha M Jones

    Hi ! Thanks for the review. I tried a Peloton spin class from my iPad using AirPlay riding my Johnny G Spinner and really enjoyed it. With 60 hours a week at work until April 16th this is the perfect way to be ready to ride. Unlike some other spinning videos they use great music. My spinner is sol old but at 13.00 per month this solution is great. When tax season is over I am on the trails ! Thanks for all the great reviews. Now to find a good bike computer but that is another post.

  21. SpinRunDrMama

    I highly recommend the iPad app for $13/month. I have a super hectic schedule — making it to a class isn’t feasible. I run 25-30 miles a week and like to do a few spin classes in addition. I have a Spinning brand bike, and I can pull up an archived Peloton class anytime I want. Aside from the initial cost of my bike, on a monthly basis there’s no doubt the Peloton app is cheaper than going to classes, and much more convenient for me. It’s not the same as being in a class (which honestly I’d prefer if my schedule allowed), but it’s the next best thing, and at my convenience. It took me a few classes to get used to adapting their Peloton-specific terminology/references to their own metrics to my own bare-bones bike (no power meter), but it actually works out fine. FWIW, I don’t think Peloton is cannibalizing their own market with the app, because even though they are awesome classes, it’s nowhere near the same thing as riding on their proprietary bikes as part of the their whole ecosystem, with the leaderboard and everything.

    • MikeQ

      SpinRunDrMama, I couldn’t agree with you more. And I second the recommendation for the iPad app. I have actually been using it since the first version came out more than a year ago. That was actually my introduction to Peloton as a company. We have a nice Schwinn AC Performance bike at home and my wife teaches spin at a local gym on the same bikes. I personally prefer to ride outside but winters in the northeast have been long, so I had been trying spin classes just to keep in shape and try something different. Sometimes its just more fun than sitting on a bike with a trainer! Anyway, this app with the $13 per month subscription is a great option. We can do classes any time and there is something very appealing to doing one of the live classes when you know that others are somewhere in a room with the instructor doing it at the same time. And if you’re a music fan, the variety of themed classes can really make your workouts a lot of fun. I just use my Wahoo app, with heart rate monitor and cadence sensor to record the workouts so I always have my stats. Schwinn also has a console option that lets you track power so I may even check that out for our bike. Kudos to Peloton for putting this app out there. I’d recommend anyone give it a try. You just might really like it!!!

  22. richard braginton

    I still can’t get my head round paying that amount of money for a spin bike when as you say you can purchase a goo midrange road bike and then one of the many turbo trainer’s available plus for the really keen the zwift hook up looks a really good bet (i see yens voight did 100 miles session on it the other day)

  23. Asaf

    can you assume this alternative is more reliable and accurate in comparison to a smart trainer PM? Also, while using a smart tainer does PM values are affected by trainer calibration (how strong the wheel is attached and tyre pressure) or does the trainer smartly knows to generate the correct wattage data in relation to the current settings? Asking differently, can one bluff and get higher PM output from is trainer by lowering is trainer pressure in tyre? And if so, how can Zwift leaderboards be taken seriously?

    • Based on the feedback here, I’d say this is generally less accuracy than a smart trainer PM (that you do a roll-down calibration on).

  24. Tim H.

    What are the concerns for the life cycle of the “tablet”? It’s running Android 4.1, and we’re now on 6.0.1. My wife really wants one of the bikes, but my concern is that either the content will eventually not be supported on 4.1, because I don’t know if the tablet is going to be getting updates like our smart phones and tablets do. Or, if it does get the Android OS updates, when will the hardware no longer support them. All of us who have smart phones and tablets (regardless of iOS versus Android) know that eventually the older models stop getting the updates. Would we be better off getting a mid-range SOLE bike and the iOS app from Peloton?

    • Dan B


      Had the same concerns and after speaking with the sales folks, bought the bike anyway(just got it two days ago). Even though the bike is running Android 4.1, it is heavily modified and is essentially only running their app. They also apply security patches and other updates OTA.

      Take it fwiw, but the sales person I spoke to said the only near-future plans are for a commercial subscription plan (i.e. 20 bikes with a $20/month fee). No plans to change the tablet or bike in the next 18-24 months.

      After receiving the bike, the tablet would be easy to replace should they release a new model. Of course it would be up to Peloton to sell the tablet separately and who knows what it would cost.

      I to considered a cheaper setup (SOLE/iPad to be exact), ultimately decided against it for ease of use. It costs more, but damn if the integration isn’t smooth and so far my wife has had 0 troubles or questions for me.

    • Dan

      Anyway to get video into the bike from an iphone or other device?

  25. Martha

    I have been using my old Johnny G spinner using the videos online (stream to TV from my iPad and am really enjoying it. I am challenged and the instructors are really good. I doubt in my case I will get a Peloton bike as the set up I have works, I would like to add a speed sensor or some type of sensor to get more info while riding. Any suggestions ?

    Thanks for this great website and forum.

  26. Joe

    Can anyone talk about the included tablet? I’m gathering it is dedicated to their Android app? I just think the subscription and high price is all about that tablet and would love to be able to drop the subscription and re-purpose the tablet. Either load another OS, open it up, or even just provide a feed from another source.

  27. sam rudman

    It is an excellent spin bike and the classes are fun. How is it that they can make a spin bike that is silent — and I mean completely silent, there is absolutely no noise — but my Kickr and every other trainer I have had screams and makes a racket? Peloton would be wise to manufacture a trainer. As far as its utility for endurance athletes, is going to spin class helpful to cyclists?

  28. DG

    Just bought my bike and I love it!
    The first year commitment is pricy but in the long term I think it will be worth it. I purchased shoes (3 hole style) and weights separately from amazon and they are fine.
    Here is my referral link if anyone is looking to purchase a bike you get two months of the subscription free (and so do I :)
    link to pelotoncycle.com

    • TR Rondeau

      I’ve had a Schwinn AC Performance Plus Carbon Blue bike for a few years now and love it! It is amazingly quiet–but definitely not silent. Is the Peloton bike really silent? I have the console and upgrade for the Schwinn so I get power (watts), cadence, and both stage and overall averages of power, “distance”, and cadence. I played around with the idea of selling the Schwinn and getting the Peloton bike, but the idea of spending all that $$ on an Android tablet that can do nothing else except spin classes (and still have to pay $39 a month) seems ridiculous. I’d rather have an iPad that I can use for other things and upgrade it when it makes sense. Plus I’ve been able to mirror the classes from my iPad to my large screen TV–I don’t think you can do that with the Android tablet that comes with the bike. However, I’m not gonna’ lie, the idea of having the Peloton bike and being part of the “group” totally appeals to my competitive nature. :-) Also, i haven’t had the opportunity to try the Peloton bike yet–that might make all the difference in the world.

    • Sam

      TR, the bike is completely silent and very comfortable. It is expensive for what it is. However, as I said in my comment it is a great spin class and having it at home is awesome. I do like the competitive nature of climbing up the leader board. Bottom line is if you are happy using the iPad and your schwinn I would stick with that and save the loot as you are basically getting the same out of it as everyone else.

    • Kirk

      Referral link. Looking to pick one up today or tomorrow

    • J.J.

      DG send me your eMail so I can get 2 mo subsc and I’ll send you mine…I’ve already got the bike. Luv it!

    • Kirk Domines

      Referral link and email. Looking to buy tomorrow

  29. Alvaro Parrado

    Does anyone know how to convert the Peloton app terminology to a Schwinn bike? They use terms like 30%, 40%, 50% resistance. Is there some trick to convert that in terms of watts, etc. – something measurable on the Schwinn console?

  30. Tom V

    You can now post automagically to Strava. Once you enable, it automatically posts all your rides.

  31. Erika

    After many, many months of thinking about this purchase, I finally pulled the trigger and bought this bike. I’ve had it almost a month, and wanted to write a review for those thinking about buying it. This link is pretty prominent if you google ‘Peloton bike review’, so I expect some not regular readers landed here while researching this bike.

    First, the target audience for this bike are people who enjoy studio spin classes. That’s a niche audience, but it’s a big niche, judging from the difficulty I have booking spin classes at the studios downtown. I’m a runner, not really a cyclist. I use spin classes for cross-training and for staying fit when I’m recovering from a running injury. I have a love/hate relationship with studio spin classes. I love the motivation, the energy of the crowd, that someone else has curated a playlist. They are better than spin classes at the gym (better bikes, better coaches, better music). I hate the popcorn jumps and arm workouts and other stupid moves that are a principal reason most real cyclists stay away from these classes. Good spin coaches stay away from this stuff, but there’s huge variation, and sometimes you’re just stuck in a class, ignoring the person you paid to tell you what to do, because you know it will put you at risk of injury (or just wasting your time). I hate that they are expensive – about $35 a class – which puts the price of the Peloton bike in context. For someone who wants to take these classes more frequently than once in a while, the Peloton bike can actually make financial sense. (I leave it to you to decide if someone who wants to take these classes frequently has a lot of sense – if you think this is crazy way to work out then you already know this bike isn’t for you.)

    So if you are someone like me, the Peloton is a great purchase. I love it. It is an expensive one-trick pony, but it’s the best thing around if that’s your pony. The Peloton is the *best* combination of bike, convenience, and coach quality I’ve ever encountered, hands down better than the high-end cycling studio downtown where I had been taking classes. A little bit more about each of these things:

    The bike: I highly recommend checking out the bike in person if there is a studio/store near you. For a spin bike, it is a thing of beauty. It’s also very smartly designed – the silent belt (my wife’s trainer is like turning on a generator, this thing is dead silent), the smoothly adjusting seat height (no pegs, so much better for getting the right fit), the gorgeous quickly responding tablet. There’s an ethernet port so my streaming quality isn’t affected by my lousy urban apartment wifi. When researching the bike, I was initially annoyed that the tablet only streamed Peloton content. That doesn’t bother me now that I have the bike. Why would I stream anything else? Because the best thing about this bike – other than the fact that you don’t have to bundle into a snowsuit to trundle out to a class at 6am – is the classes.

    The classes/coaches: This is surprisingly my favorite thing about having the bike, which I did not anticipate. In the studio cycling world, each studio has a theme, a philosophy, and a set of coaches. You find a studio you like and an instructor you like and then you try to take most of your classes with them until they leave or start only teaching at a time you can’t attend. Peloton is a major improvement on this. There are so many more choices. There appears to be no overall philosophy other than hiring the best at what they do. Each coach is different and comes with different teaching styles. Some are SoulCycle type instructors, others are professional cyclists, others are more classic trainer/coaches. Classes have themes: endurance rides and rhythm rides and fun rides. You can join a live class or if your favorite instructor isn’t teaching that second, you can join a class you missed with them earlier in the day or week. This I find unbelievably awesome. That is is actually cheaper than schlepping to classes I like less at the studio nearby is even more awesome.

    Convenience: The bike lives in your house. You can pipe a feed of a trainer coaching you through a workout at the touch of a button. You never have an excuse to work out again ever. Unless you overtrain on the thing and give yourself an injury, which I have to say is a distinct possibility. I have to force myself to take days off.

    So, to sum up – this bike isn’t for everyone. But if you like spin classes (but wish they were better) and you are considering this bike, you should pull the trigger. It’s really great.

  32. Martha

    After using the Peloton app and my ipad I could not be more happy. I can train with a live class at 5 am even though I am not on the Pelolton circuit I am using a Garmin cadence sensor and a speed sensor. They are not accurate to the numbers the teacher says but I have figured out what 50% feels like to me. I am engaged during the rides, focus on cadence and very rarely get bored. It is really helping me strengthen my legs and improve my cardio. And for only 14.00 per month.

  33. Jed

    Here’s my conundrum and I’m really at a loss. I have limited time during the day to get outside. I can hop on my trainer and bust out an hour lunch ride without having to worry about the 10-15 minutes to get out past the neighborhood hills to my preferred training grounds.

    Indoors my bike with a quarq and Zwift is great — for me. I want my kids to get on a good summer exercise program and due to the heat here in GA riding during the day ain’t fun. The adjustability of a stationary bike would be great for all four of us in the family. But loosing Zwift and Strava is just about a deal breaker for me.

    And the fact that the Peleton doesn’t auto adjust the power to simulate hills or control workout intensity doesn’t really appeal either.

    BUT with a 9 year old and 12 year old swapping bikes on a Kickr would be a chore for them. My 12 year old bike would work with 10 speed but my 9 year old would be left in the cold.

    Arg. Is there anything on the horizon that is a smart indoor bike with the adjustability of a spin bike with the brains and features of a smart trainer? I’d even take a frankenbike on a Kickr.

    • Ryan M.


      The peloton does actually connect to Strava now. Not auto adjusting for intensity is not terrible, as the control knob is very fluid, and the display gives you an accurate reading on the difficulty.

    • Rick Kelly

      It’s too bad that Wahoo hasn’t used their Kickr platform to make an adjustable exercise bike. I found out the hard way, that there’s a downside to putting your expensive carbon bike in a trainer….especially when you don’t get the skewers tightened down all the way. A smart exercise bike would keep your nice bike out of the trainer and would give you the adjustablity so that mulitple members of your family could use the bike. I’m sure it would be expensive but I imagine you’ll see it sooner than later.

    • I also use the app on my iPad. Really happy for over a year now. I use the Wahoo app to record cadence. Just wish my bike had an electronic reading on resistance for Metrics classes. I always say if they eliminated the app, I’d buy the bike. I’m that hooked.

  34. Cosmo

    Just received my bike last week and have logged 4 rides so far. Agree, fairly silent and really like both the live and pre-recorded classes on demand. It’s a schedule thing for me.

    Referral code if anyone is interested:

    link to pelotoncycle.com

  35. QARunner

    Pulled the trigger on Peloton and received my bike a couple of days ago. I really like the bike. It’s certainly the best spinning bike I have ridden – completely silent, good adjustability, good to ride and aesthetically pleasing. As a long time spinner who considered himself in shape, I was surprised how hard it was to get to the front of the leaderboard. I finish in the top 10% but it takes work. The leaderboard is a great motivator. Nothing kicks you in gear more than seeing HotMamma70 or MamaBoots creeping up on you.

    I still spin at my gym twice a week but the ability to spin on demand and eliminate the trip to the gym for live classes makes spinning really convenient and accessible when you’re balancing work and home life with staying in shape. The instructors are great and the classes are really immersive. I find that I am getting a better spinning workout at home than at the gym.

    • Kirk Domines

      I bought the bime last week and i just had referral link.
      Since i bought it at the store and not online.
      I need name and email for both to get credit.
      Please respond with both. My direct email is phantom69kirk@aol.com

  36. Clay

    Curious if there are any promo codes going on with the bike at this time? My wife and I are going to purchase. Thanks

    • cosmo

      Unfortunately there are no discounts or promos being offered except for the referral type where you get 2 free months after the 1 year mandate. I’ve heard the bike is basically being sold at cost so would not expect to see any promos in the future either.

      My referral link is below if you’d like

      link to pelotoncycle.com

  37. Kirk Domines

    I have been waiting and checking in any deals and have talked with several people and according to peloton, the only deal they will have will be the free 2 months of classes when you said you were referred bysomeone.
    If you buy and want to use a referral name, you need name and email.
    My name is kirk domines
    Good luck. It is a great bike.

  38. Vit

    As usually, when I bump in to something new (for me) and relating to cycling-running-swimming I go to Ray’s site and found a solid review of this new thing here. The same happened with Peloton, Ray, thanks again for all the details.
    The only thing missing is just you on this Peloton bike :)
    BTW, has anybody tried the sync Peloton says they have with Strava? And how it works?
    link to cadence.pelotoncycle.com

    • Cosmo

      The strava sync is pretty straight forward. You log in on bike and it will auto sync after every ride automatically if you choose. Syncs all pertinent info including cadence, hr, etc

  39. Mike

    If anyone needs a referral link for 2 free months, you can use the below:

    link to pelotoncycle.com

  40. Corey Angst

    Thanks for the review of the bike. I just purchased one on 6/26/16 and my referral code link is
    link to pelotoncycle.com
    then click on the hot pink banner near the top and we both get 2 free months!

  41. jenifer

    I live in Australia and i am a happy woman today? and i told my self that any lender that rescue my family from our poor situation, i will refer any person that is looking for loan to him, he gave me happiness to me and my family, i was in need of a loan of $50,000.00 to start my life all over as i am a single mother with 3 kids I met this honest and GOD fearing man loan lender that help me with a loan of $50,000.00 U.S. Dollar, he is a GOD fearing man, if you are in need of loan and you will pay back the loan please contact him tell him that is Mrs jenifer, that refer you to him. contact Mr,Mathew COX ,via email: mathewcox1957@gmail.com

  42. As a mother of a 5 year old this product has changed my life. I am on it about 5 times a week when ever I can fit 20, 30, 45 or 60 minutes in. I walk in, get on, clip in and burn 500+ calories while sonny has a snack or snaps legos together. I don’t care about my heart rate, I don’t care about the energy output accuracy, I care that it is FUN and fast and convenient. I’ve done almost 100 rides and almost every time I live ride the coach gives me a shout out of encouragement…. its a thrill… heck yeah I can go faster!

    Highly recommended for busy moms that want to sweat it out.

  43. Tom

    Peleton connects to strava now. Super easy/convenient. Bought this for my wife as a pre-order in 2013/2014. I ride it more in the winter than my wahoo kickr!

  44. This was a really helpful article, especially with so many gadget-type exercise tools its really helpful to get this much detail in reviewing a product! Great post.

  45. Rick C.

    I’m late to the party, but we bought one in January of this year, primarily for my wife.

    Since I can’t ride outdoors during the week due to my work schedule, I’ve gone to daily early morning spin class for the past 15 years. I use the Peloton bike 4-5 times a month when I can’t make it to the gym, or to squeeze in an extra workout.

    Overall, I really like the bike. It feels more smooth and solid than most of the spin bikes I’ve rode at various gyms over the years. On my bike, making adjustments is a little clunky, but its not a big deal.

    Sometimes, I can’t believe some of the stats of fellow riders on the leader board. Either there are some exceptional athletes that ride these things or some of the numbers are a little suspect at times.

    Also, you’ll occasionally see George Hincapie and Christian Vande Velde teach a class. A few weeks back George H taught and Cadel Evans was in the class. George recounted the 2011 TdF and Cadel’s win. (Which was fun for me, since I was at the 2011 Tour.)

    Overall, if you are like me and have to rely on spin, I think it’s a great option. I tend to work my butt off in Peloton classes, much harder than when I’m at the gym, since I see all of the stats. I’ve been so pleased thus far, that when I went to Manhattan a few weeks back, I did a class at their studio.

    Hopefully, their model continues to work.