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How to download free maps to your Garmin Edge 705/800/810

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The Garmin Edge series of cycling computers is roughly split into two categories: Those that have a mapping function, and those that don’t.  Mapping in this case means that the units also have routable navigation – just like your car GPS does.  Whereas the cycling GPS units without mapping may be able to follow a breadcrumb trail, but can’t route you on actual streets or provide visual maps.  They’re more like an Etch-a-Sketch than a phone with useful maps.

The challenge though with the higher end mapping units (Garmin Edge 705/Edge 800/Edge 810) is that as expensive as they are, they don’t actually include any maps.  Well, ok, I’ll be fair. They technically do include what’s known as a ‘basemap’.  However said basemap believes there are (for example) only three streets in New York City, and two in Paris.  Obviously with such completely useless maps, you’re not going to be able to navigate very far – or very accurately.

So instead you need to purchase more detailed maps, typically at a cost of $70-$110 per region/area.  The definition of a region varies – both in size as well as the type of map.  No matter the case, you’re spending more money on top of what you already spent.

Now there’s always been a free mapping option, but it hasn’t been until semi-recently that the process of getting these maps has been made really easy.  I outlined this within the Edge 810 review, but I wanted to call it out and make it more accessible – especially to all those owners of Edge 705/800/810 units (also useful if you want to add maps for a region other than you’ve already bought).  Additionally, I’ve simplified those instructions some.

So here’s step-by-step instructions for how to get the free Openstreet maps onto your Garmin Edge device.

Requirements:

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Despite how long all these screenshotted steps may look, the whole process is actually really quick and super easy.  It’s just that I was probably overly thorough in the screenshots.

Active time: 5-8 minutes
’Baking’ Time: A number of hours
Device: Garmin Edge 705, 800, 810
Storage: A $12 Micro-SD card to put the maps on

The step-by-step pieces only take a few minutes.  There’s a tiny bit of work to get the maps requested, which then puts you into a queue where your map request is processed and ultimately a link e-mailed to you a few hours later.  Thus the ‘baking’ time.  Then there’s a few more minutes to copy the maps to your expansion card.  Of course, there’s no reason you need to sit there and watch paint dry.  Just like you wouldn’t sit and watch dough rise.

You can get any side of Micro-SD card.  I’ve tested all three Edge units using a variety of cards from 4GB to high capacity 32GB cards.  I had no issues there with the latest firmware on any of them.  Most of the maps you’ll create are less than 1GB in size, so a 16GB card is more than sufficient.

Note that these steps require the Garmin Edge 705, 800, or 810.  All three of these units have mapping capabilities.  This won’t work on the Garmin Edge 200, 500, or 510.  Those units don’t support the mapping function.  Nor will it work on any other 3rd party units.  Sorry!

Part I: Downloading the maps

This entire post is ‘made possible by’ OpenStreet maps, which are free community driven maps.  Openstreet maps have become in many areas just as good as maps from traditional providers.  And best of all, they’re free.  The below site simply does all the hard-work that you used to have to do manually a few years ago if you wanted to use OpenStreet maps.  Now, it’s literally as easy as 1.2.3.

First up, going to the site.  Which, will bring you here:

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(Note: There are a few other free sites out there, but none offer as simple an interface, nor as widespread a geographic mapset to download)

You’ll want to then choose ‘Routable Bicycle’ as the map type.

Choose Routable Bicycle:

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Now you’ll select which maps you want.  Because highly detailed maps like these can be somewhat large, you’ll likely need to pickup a cheap Micro-SD card.  Some smaller maps may fit directly on your Edge device, but only if you’re talking a fairly small area.  For me, I like to load up maps for anywhere nearby I might ride.

In any case, you’ll start by choosing your continent, then country.  In some areas (such as the US and Canada), you’ll also choose the state/province.

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In my case, I went ahead and selected North America, then United States, then Washington State.  You’ll see how the map then will zoom in and show me the ‘tiles’ that represent Washington State.  Tiles are ways that the entire world can be broken down into consumable map chunks.  Tiles don’t usually map directly to states, but rather to large swaths of land – ideally designed to keep tile sizes somewhat consistent.

You can see below that it’s highlighted all tiles that ‘cover’ Washington State.

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Now, if you plan to venture outside your selected area – or if you want to choose a smaller area, simply enable ‘Manual tile selection’, which allows you to just pick and choose exactly which areas you need.

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For my trip to Seattle, I did just this.  I narrowed it down to just the local area that I was likely to ride in.  This would reduce my download time, as well as my transfer times later on to my device.  But, if you plan to have the maps around for a while on your device, choose a larger set so you always have coverage.

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Once that’s done you’ll go ahead and enter in your e-mail address to build the map.  I’ll explain this in a second.

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The service works by generating the maps for you based on your specifications.  This means it takes a bit of time, sorta like putting in an order at a restaurant.  To do this it places you into a queue, and your e-mail address is simply used to notify you when your maps are ready.

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You’ll get an e-mail a couple seconds later with a link that you can go to and check the status of your map creation:

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The delay may range from a few minutes to a few hours.  No worries, when it’s done it’ll send you another e-mail and you can go pickup your files then:

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With that, click on the link to be taken to download the maps.  Once there, you’ll see you have a few options.  The only one we’re going to pay attention to is the one ending with ‘gmapsupp.zip’.  This is essentially a self-contained map file ready to drop right onto your Garmin.

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With that, download the file someplace handy (like your desktop or downloads folder), and we’ll come back to it in a second.

I should point out that there’s a ‘Donate’ button on that site (I have no affiliation with it, nor do I even know them or ever contacted them).  Obviously, good karma dictates that if you find their (free/community hosted) service valuable, sending a couple bucks their way is probably wise – especially given how much money you’re saving.

Part II: Installing the maps

Next comes the easy part.  The file you downloaded is a standard Zip file, which means the actual map file is inside it.  Just like a package from FedEx.  So you’ll go ahead and open up the Zip file to access the map file inside (gmapsupp.img).

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Now take your Micro-SD card and insert it into your computer via the Micro-SD card adapter that likely came with it, or stick it into the Edge unit and plug that into your computer and access it via that way.

When you do so you’ll now have a blank card ready to dump some files on…err, a single file.  First you’ll create a directory on it called GARMIN .

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Then, simply copy/move the gmapsupp.img file right inside the GARMIN directory on your Micro-SD card.

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And just like that, you’re done.  Well, do remember to put the Micro-SD card in the slot if you haven’t done so yet.

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Ok, now we’re done – for real this time.

Part III: Enabling and using the maps

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When you first turn on the Edge for the first time with the new maps, it’ll inventory the maps and then make them available to you.  Depending on how big a mapset you created, this may take a few seconds – or a few minutes.  Don’t worry, just let it complete.

Once that’s done, the map should be ready to use.  In the unlikely event your new mapset isn’t enabled, you can do so manually.  It’s pretty quick and easy.

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Here’s how to manually enable the map layer (again, only if for some reason it’s not enabled), on each of the units out there today (side note: fiets simply means ‘bike’ in Dutch – thus OpenBikeMap):

Edge 705: Menu > Settings > Map > Next to “Openfietsmap Lite” select the checkbox under ‘Show’

Edge 800: Menu > Wrench Icon > System > Map > Map Information/Select Map > Select “Openfietsmap Lite” and choose Enable

Edge 810: Wrench Icon > Activity Profiles > Your activity profile name > Navigation > Map > Map Information/Select Map > Select “Openfietsmap Lite” and choose Enable

Once you’ve got the maps enabled (if that didn’t happen), then you’re ready to use them.

It should be noted that these maps are fully routable, and also include plenty of POI’s (Points of Interest).

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To demonstrate this, you can see how I can search for various nearby eateries and find results:

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And then you’ll see how it provides routable directions on streets or even paths in this case.  For each step along the way it’ll provide ‘Turn left on Maple Street’ type directions:

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You can of course always enter in a specific address or other destination, and it’ll route to that.  And if you simply have created a course online (you can do that free on Garmin Connect and transfer it to your Edge), then it’ll provide the map information for that course as it routes.

With that, you’re ready to roll (quite literally).  Go forth and enjoy!

As always, thanks for reading!

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189 Comments

  1. I came acrosss the site link to raumbezug.eu a few years ago. They also produce free maps based on OpenStreetMap. They have the files rebuild by country it might be easier to get the maps from here (replacing the Part I of the article). The install procedure is the same.

    Reply
    • Richard replied

      i tried using raumbezug as I could not open the maps on OSM (I have an iMac using Max OS X 10.6.8 v1.1); i have the same problem with these maps – it says I have ‘no mountable file systems’. what does this mean??

      Reply
    • eric scharlow replied

      I am very dissapointed. Your write ups are usually very detailed. This one is very vague and poor. The part that you call easy is not easy. Your instructions that you simply rename the folder and copy are piss poor. Why don’t you actually explain how you do that. You literally showed the dimensions of every garmin side by side at every angle the fact that you would choose to leave out so many details is shocking. I have got the email and downloaded the link to osm2.pleiades.uni-wuppertal.de. I cant figure out how to open the damn thing and how to get it on my sd card. Instead of saying how it easy is and you just “copy” it why dont you actually try explaining it and show the screen shots. Then it would a useful tutuorial.

      Reply
  2. Henrik

    Have you tried http://velomap.org and link to openmtbmap.org ? I have used these maps for the two latest years, and I’m really impressed by the quality of the maps – and also the web site(s).

    Reply
  3. RV

    Very nice write-up, very useful for many.
    I have never tried the Openfietsmap Lite, only the full one, on this website you can download the pre-compiled files (link to openfietsmap.nl). There is also a hiking layer for people who would like to walk with their GPS.
    In combination with the free to download Garmin Basecamp you can make nice routes (use automobile autorouting, trust me this works best, as highways are forbidden) on your PC and transfer those to your garmin GPS. I’ve been using this for the last 3 years. The good thing is that these maps also have a DEM (digital elevation map) which enables to calculate the altitude profile of the route on forehand on the pc (or in GPS with the 62s, I do not know for the higher edge series).

    Reply
    • Openfietsmap replied

      The full version does not contain DEM data, only contour lines. It’s possible to calculate an altitude profile on your pc but not on the GPS (for this you need a Garmin topo map with DEM data, like the recreational map Europe that is included in the T versions of the Garmin units)

      Reply
  4. Chuck McGee

    Thank you, Ray! Great explanation as usual. I have followed your steps and added a second map to my Garmin 810. I also have the Garmin North America map that I paid for. Since I am new to the 810, I am hoping you (or someone) can tell me if having two maps for the same area will be confusing to the unit and could cause issues. While they are both “active” on my device, I am wondering how I know which one is being used predominantly. If I have the North American maps from Garmin, do I even need the Open Streetmap version?

    For as much information as I can find about the ability to have more than one map on the 810, I can unable to determine how multiple maps work on the device and what I need to know to take advantage of both of them.

    Reply
    • RV replied

      You can turn off and on maps individually, I always leave the basemap switched on. This is necessary for zooming out. Then switch on the map you want to leave on for that moment. Most likely you can also rename the gmapsupp.img filename to CN-USA.img and Bikemap.img (this is for the garmin 62s), if that does not work name name one map gmapsupp.img and the other gmapsup1.img (this is the method for Nuvi devices).

      Reply
    • Chuck McGee replied

      Thank you, RV. To you or anyone else, is there any point in having the Open Streetmaps and the Garmin North American maps together on the same device if the Open Streetmaps cover the same region? Do the Open Streetmaps provide better accuracy in general? I may just remove it and trust I understand the process of adding others.

      Reply
    • Changren Yong replied

      I find that if i have both the Garmin map and the Openstreet map enabled, my Edge 800 uses the Garmin one.

      Reply
    • Barry replied

      I switch back and fourth between the Garmin map and the openstreetmap. The Garmin map is less busy and more readable in dense urban areas. Off road, the openstreetmap is by far the best for trails. In rural areas both are fine.

      Reply
  5. Thanks Ray for posting this nice tutorial!

    Happy cycling,
    Minko (designer of the openfietsmap)

    Reply
    • Eli replied

      Thanks for the work in making the maps

      Reply
  6. Alberto

    Thanks very much Ray! I bet this post will become a top hit in google soon.

    Question: what are the resolution (amount of details) and accuracy (difference from reality) of these maps? How are they obtained? Cartography is a tricky business, are we sure these maps are good and reliable?

    Reply
    • hans replied

      Alberto,

      I’m a longtime openstreetmap user and a small contributor. The accuracy of the maps depends on the region, but is getting better every day. And I confirm that for certain parts it is even more detailed, and updated a lot faster then commercial maps.

      As a user the only ‘problem’ I’ve had is that not all trails are on the map. Since I love walking and trail running, I’m talking mostly about really small trails lost in a forest. Most of the normal ways and roads are on the map. at least where I used it (mostly Belgium).

      But that is also easy to fix (hence the contributor part) and if you don’t want to update the maps yourself it is also possible to just upload your gps traces, or log bugs on the map so that the other contributors can update the map.

      regards
      hans

      Reply
    • Eli replied

      From my experience most roads are accurate. Still need to be careful when your garmin says you are off course but only cause the road on the map is not really following the road in reality. Happened over the weekend, now to figure out if its already been fixed, if my GPS recording was correct, or if it needs fixing.

      Reply
    • Nick replied

      The resolution is excellent.

      In my experience (in Australia) the accuracy is slightly better than Google Maps (especially for off-road trails).

      The cycling specific maps are quite a bit better than Google Maps because they tend to update quicker. That means when the legal status of a trail changes (eg, are bikes allowed on it or not) Open Street Maps tends to be updated quicker.

      (Of course, you’ll need to download the latest version yourself manually, but that is the same in any case).

      Reply
    • Matt replied

      My problem is that I purchased the Garmin City Nav NT from Garmin. They provided a 2GB card which is almost full. How can I move it to a larger card?

      Reply
    • Changren Yong replied

      Matt,

      I don’t if it’s legal to move the Garmin map from the 2GB micro SD card to a larger-capacity micro SD card even if you have purchased it from Garmin. Garmin has installed an anti-piracy mechanism that prevents the Edge 800 from reading any map that has been moved/copied to a different micro SD card. You will see a “cannot authenticate maps” error message.

      There are ways to break this anti-piracy mechanism but i’m not going to describe it here. You can google for it.

      Reply
  7. John

    I am guessing that this process is probably valid for uploading maps to my Oregon 450. Am I correct?

    Reply
    • Rainmaker replied

      It should be. I haven’t tried it myself unfortunately.

      Reply
    • John replied

      I’ll make an attempt and report via email.

      Reply
    • Craig replied

      Yes, it will work fine for the Oregon 450 (or the Etrex 20/30 or Dakota or Montana etc).
      The Oregon has 850MB of internal memory, so you can just copy the maps to that. You don’t need a memory card unless you want maps for a large area. Just so long as you copy the img file to a directory named ‘Garmin’ in the internal memory.

      Reply
  8. Eli

    Edge 705 units only support the singular gmapsupp.img file. Edge 8×0 units can support multiple img files so they don’t need to be named gmapsupp.img

    There are multiple OSM maps that work on the Edge units. While they all use the same base OSM data they do render the maps differently (prioritizing certain streets over others, what details are shown, making the roads look different enough from the purple line garmin drawls the course with to make it easy to follow the line, etc)

    Some are just changed around by using a different TYP file:
    link to avdweb.nl

    Some are more involved then just the TYP file:
    link to velomap.org
    They have two different map layouts: link to velomap.org

    One of these days I’ll figure out which I like more.

    Reply
  9. JaapWgt

    Thanks, Ray! Very handy.

    Immediately filed a request at OSM. Going to test it on the Edge 705. This is an easy way to pre-setup IMG files for different areas.

    Reply
  10. ekutter

    In addition to the OSM maps mentioned here, you can get extremely detailed trail maps. In the case of the pacific North West (Washington, Oregon, Idaho, British Columbia), there is a great set of free maps available at http://switchbacks.com. Amazingly detailed trail maps of pretty much every trail in the region, big or small, paved or dirt. They will overlay on top of any other maps you have but are not route-able. Even better, if you come across a trail that isn’t listed, ride the trail and send them the track. They’ll add it into the next update.

    Reply
  11. PeteDin206

    Haha, you must be sending a huge amount of traffic to them because there are 88 requests and an 8.8 hour queue right now. Last time I pulled a test map from them it was like 20 minutes for the same map (lost the file somewhere).

    Thanks for the guide.

    Reply
  12. Victor

    Any key differences between the free maps and the Garmin ones? More info, better graphics, up to date, etc? What about a side by side comparison shot between the two?

    Reply
    • Eli replied

      Short answer, garmins will be more consistent quality for all areas of the map while OSM can be much better for some and worse for others

      The free ones are mostly all based on OSM (see my comment a few up from here) As to the differences between OSM and Garmin. OSM depends on volunteers to make, fix and update the maps. So if you bike in an area with OSM contributors then the maps will be very good and will have updates as soon as a change happens but there is also the chance that OSM volunteers don’t care about a certain area.

      Garmin makes a commercial map so when that data is being compiled they mostly don’t play favorites so all areas get the same treatment so everything will be covered and updates take longer.

      Reply
    • Rainmaker replied

      Yup, I’d agree with exactly what Eli says.

      I actually took some comparative shots in my Edge 810 review (I think) showing the exact same spot on the different map-sets. I’ll try and dig up those shots today and add them to this post to see.

      Reply
    • Victor replied

      Thanks Eli and Ray! Yes, if you had a shot of an OSM and Garmin Map of the same location, it would be great! It would be good to know which is more pleasing to my eye!

      Reply
    • Craig replied

      The OSM maps do have a lot of details that are not in any of the Garmin maps, eg footpaths, cycleways etc. So they can be very useful for walking and off-road cycling.

      OSM maps are available in a variety of styles. Some use the standard Garmin style, so look much the same as Garmin maps, others are designed with better colours and icons, to highlight particular things. eg the Openfietsmap highlights cycle routes. Though it does depend on what Garmin device you are using, some maps may look better than others. Its worth trying a few different OSM maps, to see what you prefer.

      Reply
    • Changren Yong replied

      I primarily use my Garmin Edge 800 in around the Seattle area so i’ll just comment on my experience with the Garmin maps versus the ones from OSM.

      The Garmin map that came with my Edge 800 bundle is version CN North America NT 2012.20. It does a pretty decent job on routing on city streets. However, for whatever reason, a huge portion of the well-known Burke Gilman Trail (a paved multi-use trail) is missing. Also, it has no information on the newer Centennial Trial. For the portion of BGT it is aware of, it would does route you to use it.

      For the OSM created using Ray’s suggested option Routable Bicycle (Openfietsmap Lite), both the Burke Gilman Trail and the Centennial Trail show up. Even though this is supposed to create a more cyclist-friendly map, no matter what i do, the Edge 800 just refuses to route me onto bike trails. Instead, it would put me on city streets even though the bike trail is close to them.

      Just like the map created using the Openfietsmap Lite option, the OSM created using the Generic Routable option included the BGT and Centennial Trail. My Edge 800, however, is able to route me onto bike trails most of the time.

      Reply
  13. RickH

    I have the 705 and spent a weekend recently trying to get open maps on my device until I saw this site. Very grateful for that and now the open maps are installed.
    I purchased the Garmin maps some 4 years ago with my unit but Garmin will not upgrade the card, only sell a new one and for Australia they are somewhere in the order of $185. Not only that, due to the ever expanding urban sprawl, a lot of new suburbs with streets are not on the maps but, they are with the Opensteet maps.
    So, in short it was worth the trouble. DC’s tutorial was inspirational and informative but, after all that I see Garmin has an 800 at an unbelievable price, unfortunately, for US and Canada only (groan).
    DC, thank you for your writings.

    Reply
  14. Eli

    You can do OSM maps on the Fenix too
    link to gmaptool.eu

    Reply
  15. Thanks Ray, this is exactly my next task as I go from rehabilitating my shoulder on the trainer to riding outdoors again. I thought readers may be interested in a simple batch file for windows that I’ve written and published which allows for backing up data (in particular, the FIT files) so that we’re not all getting locked into Garmin Connect which doesn’t have a bulk export facility. Hope you don’t mind me plugging my article :) link to teambobbydazzlers.com

    Reply
    • Tom Bammann replied

      I should add, you’re welcome to improve or publish the batch file script on dcrainmaker too, if you think it’d benefit others :)

      Reply
    • Rainmaker replied

      Nice stuff Tom! I’ve added it to my list of things to chew on a bit (as in, figure out where to add it to a post/etc…). Cool stuff!

      Reply
  16. Greg Tompos

    Thanks, Ray. I have no preference either way with regard to how they look, but I can say the OpenStreet maps are MUCH, MUCH more accurate than the 2 year old map I had in the Garmin Edge 800 (for a fast-growing area of Canberra, Australia).

    Reply
  17. extremeliver

    I am about to purchase the Edge 810. Is there any reason to purchase the bundle for $200 more that has City Navigator on an SD card? I already have the HR strap and speed/cadence sensor. If I get the package with City Navigator, can I add the free maps to the same sd card? Do the two play well together?

    Reply
    • Changren Yong replied

      On my Edge 800, i can enable multiple maps at the same time but if the Garmin City Navigator map is also enabled, it will take precedence over other maps. The SD card that came with the Edge 800 is 2 GB. It only had a few hundred MB of free space available. To give you an example of the size of an OSM. An OSM including the whole state of Washington, plus portions of Oregon and British Columbia is about 160 MB. Personally, i don’t think it’s necessary to pay $200 more for the City Navigator map since the free OSM is quite good.

      Reply
    • Changren Yong replied

      That said, with maps created using garmin.openstreetmap.nl, i do have problems with the turn-by-turn directions on some pre-defined courses (uploaded to the Garmin as a TCX file) if the starting and end points are the same or very close to one another. Instead of giving me the actual turn-by-turn directions for the entire course, my Edge 800 would produce the directions to get to the end point, not realizing that i have not actually started. The Garmin City Navigator map seems to be better in this regard. This problem does not happen to all the courses with the same starting/end points so at this moment i’m at loss as to why it works for some courses but not others. My solution for problematic courses is to move the end point further away from the starting point.

      Reply
    • extremeliver replied

      Thanks for the insight. I think I’ll go for the cheaper version!

      Reply
  18. Randy S

    I tried this on the 705 (version 3.3) and followed the steps to ensure map was enabled (Edge 705: Menu > Settings > Map > Next to “Openfietsmap Lite” select the checkbox under ‘Show’). I don’t see the “Openfietsmap Lite”. In the Map box, it is blank (file shows up on the SD card when I plug the unit into my PC). I still have the ‘etch-a-sketch’ map when I use the 705. Any ideas?

    Reply
    • Ray replied

      Look for gmapsupp.img.

      Reply
    • Ray replied

      Whoops. Cancel that last comment.

      Reply
    • Santosh Bosch replied

      I have the same problem with my garmin edge 705, have u allready find a why to activate the map ?

      Reply
  19. Bob Quindazzi

    Is there any reason one wouldn’t just make one giant map file of anywhere one was likely to ride? I live in Rhode Island, so when I made my request I selected from Eastern New York and all of New England. Is there some downside to this that I’m missing?
    Could one choose say, the entire eastern seaboard?

    Reply
    • Ray replied

      You could, but the resulting .img file may not fit on your GPS.

      Reply
    • Bob Quindazzi replied

      That’s down to the size of the SD card, correct?
      I’m new to the Edge (haven’t even received it yet) but Ray’s directions imply you leave the SD card in place.

      Reply
    • Ray replied

      Yes. Limited by the 800′s SD card size, which I believe is limited to a standard speed 32GB, but mine card is smaller.

      Reply
  20. @Changren Yong: To route onto bike trails, make sure you have NOT selected highway avoidance, because cycleways are the main highways on my map. To force navigation on bike routes, select toll road avoidance

    Reply
    • Changren Yong replied

      Thanks, removing highway avoidance did the trick.

      Reply
  21. Ray

    Any recommendations on exactly how to config the Edge 800 to route best using the Openfietsmap Lite maps? e.g. I’ve found items like don’t avoid highways as the cycle routes are the highways, toll roads on or off do something else, carpool lanes on or off indicate special routing, etc. ???

    Reply
    • Ray replied

      e.g. does this look correct? Comments? esp on the Toll Roads setting. Thx.

      ——–

      Routing on a Garmin Edge 800 GPS using Openfietsmap Lite from link to garmin.openstreetmap.nl for a road bike;

      Summarized from link to mijndev.openstreetmap.nl

      Menu > Wrench > System > Map > Map Information Select Map > Openfietsmap Lite (Enabled) Basemap (Enabled) City Navigator (Disabled)

      Menu > Wrench > Routing > Calculate Routes for = Bicycle
      Guidance Method = On Road for Time
      Lock on Road = No
      Aviodance Setup Toll Roads, U-Turns…
      U-Turns = Do Not Avoid
      Toll Roads = Do Not Avoid (avoidance will route on bike routes only (“NOT available in the cycling activitiy modes!”), but this last point confuses me)
      Highways = Do Not Avoid (cycleroutes and cycleways are the main highways)
      Unpaved Roads = Avoid (no routing on tracks, steps and unpaved (foot) paths, except gravel bike path. Also roads paved with cobblestones are avoided.)
      Carpool Lanes = Avoid (avoids unpaved roads, footways and steps)
      Recalucate = Prompted

      Reply
  22. Not sure if the Edge 800 already has the latest “active routing” navgation that is implemented in Basecamp.
    If that is the case, you better use Car Navigation instead of bicycle. If you have an older firmware or older models like the Etrex 700 series or the old Etrex, you can use bicycle.

    Guidance Method = On Road for Time – will prefer bicycle routes, distance will seek the shortest route

    Lock on Road = No

    Aviodance Setup Toll Roads, U-Turns…

    U-Turns = Do Not Avoid – Avoid if you want to continue and not turn back

    Toll Roads = Do Not Avoid (avoidance will route on bike routes only (“NOT available in the cycling activitiy modes!”), but this last point confuses me)

    This means you have the latest “active routing”; In this case toll road avoidance is only available in the car or motorcycle navigation. Garmin doesn’t understand I’m misusing this feature and deleted this option in their latest firmwares :( They also made carpool avoidance default in all bicycle profiles, which means unpaved roads are often avoided, see below.

    You can use motorcycle profile for instance to use a nice route with detours over bicycle routes, and car profile for more direct routes.

    Highways = Do Not Avoid (cycleroutes and cycleways are the main highways)

    Unpaved Roads = Avoid (no routing on tracks, steps and unpaved (foot) paths, except gravel bike path. Also roads paved with cobblestones are avoided.) – MTB’s should not use this option obviously ;-)

    Carpool Lanes = Avoid (avoids unpaved roads, footways and steps) – same as above, recommended for a racing biker to have this selected

    Reply
    • Ray replied

      Regarding the availability of “active routing” on the Edge 800… I checked with Garmin Product Support and received the following response;

      ‘Thank you for contacting Garmin International.

      The routing programming that is in the Edge 800, will not be the same as what is used in BaseCamp. You will see a closer resemblance of routing between Garmin Connect, and the Edge 800. This is due to these products being a fitness specific area. While BaseCamp is designed for our outdoor products. If you have any further questions, please contact us.

      Thank you for choosing Garmin.’

      Reply
  23. Ron

    Ray,

    I downloaded the openstreet map to my garmin and it is there but when I put in quite a few addresses it says calculating for a while and then says no routes available. Also a lot of addresses of pretty main streets are not there when I do intersections. When I have my garmin on and riding those street names are showing on the map. Any ideas

    Thanks

    Reply
  24. Ray, thanks for the nice article. The quality of OSM data really depends if we have contributors that are interested in the area in question. In places that nobody cares about you wont see the incredible level of detail that we have in our core areas..

    To all: we have recently launched both a simplified way to report issues with the data link to blog.openstreetmap.org and a HTML5 based “beginners” editor: link to blog.openstreetmap.org

    Please if you notice an issue report it it via the “notes” function or, even better, fix the problem itself. If you don’t jump in at the deep end, adding to OSM data is easy and you can gradualy progress to more difficult things with time.

    Simon

    PS: it is OpenStreetMap (no “s” :-))

    Reply
    • Changren Yong replied

      Thanks Simon! I have started to update incorrect datas on OSM that i discovered on my long weekend rides and have been busy adding/updating the maps in my neighborhood. I really like using OSM because if something is missing or incorrect, i can always correct it myself, unlike Garmin’s City Navigator (the latest version is still missing some important local paved bike trails).

      Reply
  25. george

    I followed your instructions and successfully downloaded the map to the SD card on my Garmin 800. the Garmin does not recognize the files on the SD card. the maps on the SD card do not show up in Maps section. the How do I enable the maps?

    I enjoy your reviews and travel pics.

    george

    Reply
    • Changren Yong replied

      You don’t see any maps? At the minimal, you should see the base map (this map is actually stored within the Edge 800, not the micro SD card). Is the SD card that one that came with your Garmin? If it is, you may have accidentally overwritten Garmin’s City Navigator map because that file is also named gmapsupp.img. That may explain why you can’t see the map you downloaded on the phone. Why don’t you try renaming it from gmapsupp.img to something else, like omapsupp.img. When i was using Garmin’s micro SD card (which contained City Navigator), i would rename the OSM maps to something other than gmapsupp.img so that i could choose which map to enable.

      Reply
  26. george

    Thanks for the help Changren,

    The base maps are present on the garmin 800. The sd card is blank. The garmin will not create any directories on the sd card when it is installed in the garmin. I can’t get the OSM maps to appear on the device.

    Reply
    • Changren Yong replied

      Ok, if I’m reading you correctly, I think you did not create a “Garmin” folder on your micro SD card. You need to create this folder in the card while it’s connected to your computer. Then transfer the gmapsupp.img to that folder.

      Reply
  27. dan goldman

    Hi Ray, thanks for this info. I am downloading Italy for a trip there in a few weeks. I followed your instructions but when I tried to unzip the file called openfietsmap_lite_gmapsupp.zip, it produced a file that was about 88.6MB (which seems about right) called openfietsmap_lite_gmapsupp.zip.part. So, my simple question is how do I get to an image file from that. The zip also created another file called openfietsmap_lite_gmapsupp.zip.cpgz which is about 268 bytes. I would appreciate your guidance. Thanks so much, Dan

    Reply
    • Changren Yong replied

      Your download most likely did not complete. I would suggest downloading again.

      Reply
  28. dan goldman

    thx. that worked!

    Reply
  29. Alan

    I am headed on a trip to the Provence and Burgundy regions of France and want to know if the OpenStreet maps are adequate for navigation or whether I should use the Garmin maps on my Edge 800. I have used the OpenStreet maps in the US and they are fine for me but just want to ck in before starting a trip.

    Thanks!!!

    Reply
  30. Stephen Weiss

    I’m new to the Edge GPSs. In the past I have used a Nuvi for both car and bike but the newer Nuvi changes routes without announcing it even when I am not off course [No option to prevent recalculation]. Following the excellent directions I was able to download and install OSM maps. I then tried to create a track using BaseCamp (with the Garmin maps). I put it in the appropriate directory and was able to select it under courses. It displays properly on the Edge 800 but does not give me directions as I follow it. Is this what is meant by “active routing” above? Is there something wrong with my configuration or should I have created the track specifying motorcyle? I didn’t understand the comments in #51.

    Reply
  31. Rick Arwood

    Are these free maps topo and do they typically have State and Natl Forest trails marked (for Mtn biking)? Thanks for all the info!

    Reply
  32. John

    Tried to download on a Mac and I don’t get a Zip file – I get a file with the extension .img that I can’t open. Any suggestions?

    Reply
    • Ray replied

      Is it gmapsupp.img? If so, that is your map.

      Reply
    • Changren Yong replied

      Your Mac most likely unzipped it for you automatically. If that’s the case, the file with the .img extension is not the same type of file as a disk image on a Mac. Just transfer the file to the “Garmin” folder on the micro SD card and you are good to go.

      Reply
  33. Hello, great review, just what I was looking for before buying an Edge 810. So I did and it arrived a couple of days ago. However I have been trying to put maps on it unsuccessfully for the same past days (everything else works fine). Here is my situation in hopes that someone might be able to solve it:

    I downloaded and installed two maps from garmin.openstreetmap.nl
    I then renamed both the maps using JaVaWa GMTK
    The maps show up correctly in BootCamp and I can seitch between them using the drop down menu
    I then transfered the files to the memory card in the Edge using the “Send map to device (or something like that)” function. This took a long time, almost an hour.
    I have a 64 GB micro SD card where I have put the maps.
    When I go to: “navigation > map >map information select map” I only see the “INTL Standard Basemap, NR” enabled. There are no other maps on the list.

    I have also tried to transfer a BirdsEye demo map to the device (not to the memory card, but to the internal storage) and this doesn’t show up either.

    When I access the memory card I can see a couple of .img files in a folder named “Garmin”

    Would appreciate any help as I am getting quite frustrated since I bought this mainly for the routing features.

    Reply
    • Victor replied

      I have now successfully loaded a map, this time I put it on the internal memory and it worked. It doesn’t solve my problem however as I need to put the map on a micro SD card.
      Could it be that my 64 GB card is not supported?

      Reply
    • Changren Yong replied

      According to Garmin, the largest micro SD card supported is 32GB:

      link to support.garmin.com

      Reply
  34. Ray

    From the Garmin site;

    What is the largest size microSD card I can use with my Edge 810, 800, 705 and 605?

    The Edge 810, 800, 705 and 605 have an expandable memory slot into which a microSD* card can be inserted. This card provides the ability to install detailed mapping to enhance the device’s internal basemap.

    It is recommended a standard speed card, no larger than 32 GB, be used in order to get the best performance from the device. Class 4 to Class 10 is considered standard speed.

    Reply
  35. A couple of pointers:

    - general OSM related questions can be asked on help.openstreetmap.org (please search for an answer first)

    - coverage: I would recommend checking the map on http://www.openstreetmap.org (note: the default map is designed to give mappers fast feedback on their contributions, not to look good), if you are expecting lots of trails and tracks and don’t see any, then you might have to consider using something else. However in most of western Europe the coverage is very good.

    Besides use on Garmin devices there is a OSM plugin for SportTracks, Garmin Connect offers it as an alternative map source and there are a number of (non-sports) navigation apps for Android and iOS based devices.

    Reply
  36. Bruce

    I hope this question hasn’t already been asked and answered and my apologies if it has. I can’t see OpenBikeMap as an option to enable. I followed the directions, which as usual were excellent – you can never have too many screen shots for us non-techy types. The gmapsupp, disc image file transferred to the SD and is in a folder Garmin. The SD card is installed in the Garmin slot (BTW, it is a 32 GM Card). The problem is that when I follow Ray’s steps to manually enable the map OpenBikeMap isn’t an option. The only option is the AMR Standard Basemap, NR. Do I need to disable the ANR Standard before the OpenBikeMap option becomes available? Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Thank you. Regards, Bruce

    Reply
    • Changren Yong replied

      How was the micro SD formatted? I have a Mac so the first time i formatted the micro SD card as exFAT, my Edge 800 was not able to read anything off it. After i reformatted it as FAT32, the problem went away.

      Reply
  37. Ian

    After downloading the map, I have created a course to follow on my ride using connect.garmin.com. While accessing the course on my Garmin 800, is there a way to still see POI’s, or do I have to exit the course?

    I am new to the area I am riding in and want to be able to see if there are any convenience stores that are either on my route ahead or how far off my route they may be.

    Thanks for any help.

    Reply
    • Changren Yong replied

      On the OSM created using Ray’s instructions, i can see icon for gas station if i zoom in on the map to the 300ft level after loading a course. You just have to make sure the Map Detail Level (on Edge 800) is at least at “Less”. If it’s set to “Least”, you won’t see any POI unless the map view level is 120ft.

      In comparison, POIs can be seen at the 300ft level using Garmin City Navigator map even when the Map Detail Level is set to “Least”.

      Reply
  38. Wheatthins

    Thanks for the great articles.
    I got a 810 yesterday for fathers day. I like to do a mix of gravel/ road/ trail on the CX bike, especially in places without cell service. Ideally, I’d like to download a route from map my ride or google earth into the 810, and then get turn by turn directions.
    Do you have a article for “your garmin for dummies” that might help me (and others in similar siuations out)?
    I think I’ll need to begin by getting a card and downloading these openstreet maps, but I’m not even sure they willinclude the mix of trails?
    Thanks,
    Wheatthins

    Reply
  39. Frenchman

    Ray are you aware of any limitations such as “the bigger the card the slower the Edge is at accessing maps off it when it gets close to full?” I am actually asking about the Edge 800 that I got during the Memorial Day sale (thanks for the link to the maps instructions here! I hope this works well on a Mac too). I’d probably look at an 8 Gb or 16 Gb card at most (finding a 4 Gb might be tough nowadays…). Is there a good rule of thumb to estimate the size of a region (e.g. Europe 4 Gb, Western America blah blah)?

    Reply
    • Rainmaker replied

      I’m not aware of any such issues with sizing.

      For reference, this weekend I downloaded all of France + a chunk of Spain + a chunk of UK. All in about maybe 15% of Europe from a land standpoint. It as just under 1GB.

      Reply
  40. Frenchman

    Thanks Ray. And all classes (4 to 10) are equally as good in the Edge? I don’t care that much about transfer time to the card that much… I figure that’s the small part of the time it takes to get maps, even though I plan to download my routes from the RideWithGPS site too. I care about how fast the Edge needs to/can read the data.

    Reply
    • Rainmaker replied

      Hmm, I haven’t tested to check any differences there, but I can’t imagine it would make any difference to the Edge, as it wouldn’t come anywhere near those speeds.

      Reply
    • Changren Yong replied

      Transferring data directly to the Edge 800 (i assume it’s the same for 810) takes a very long time. It’s significantly faster if you transfer the map to the micro SD card connected directly to your computer.

      Reply
  41. Bruce

    Coming back to my original question, if I may, please. The SD card shows that maps were successfully downloaded to the card. The card is in my 800. The computer recognizes the card and when I click on the card the maps are in a folder named Garmin. My problem, however, is that when I try to enable the maps, the 800 dorsn’t show the map set. I am sure I missed one of Ray’s excellent steps, but I can’t figure out what it is. Any help would be appreciated. Thank you,
    Bruce

    Reply
    • Changren Yong replied

      See my response to your original question.

      Reply
  42. Changren Yong

    See my response to your original question.

    Reply
  43. Bruce

    Thanks. I missed that response. I did realize the SD card had to be formatted. Does it make a difference that I have a PC? I guess if I format the card I will have to reload the maps. One thing that concerns me do I have the card set up correctly, i.e. the folder or directory that the map file is in. Guess I need to go back and read the directions again. Regards, Bruce

    Reply
    • Changren Yong replied

      Makes no difference if you have a PC or a Mac. I don’t know how to check the format of the SD card on a PC but on a Mac, you use a program called Disk Utility. In any case, even if you have to reformat it, i don’t think it’s that big of a deal. Just make sure you choose FAT32 when you reformat it. After that create a “garmin” folder (i don’t think the case letter matters) and copy the map to that folder.

      Reply
    • Rainmaker replied

      On a PC, you can right click the drive (assuming it’s put in an SD card reader) and then click ‘Properties’. It’ll say ‘File System:’ about 1/3rd the way down.

      Also as noted above validate that you placed the IMG file, not the .ZIP file into the Garmin folder.

      Reply
  44. Dogancan

    Thank you!!It works………

    Reply
  45. Frenchman

    Hmmm… I call a fail in the Seattle area, and even a bigger fail than Changren Yong reported, at least with the maps in MapSource (activity: Bicycling or Tour Cycling). Look at those screenshots: link to i41.tinypic.com show two routes from Village Wines to the Fremont Troll. The closest one to the Burke Gilman trail is from the routable cycling, the other one is from the generic routing (really bad!). But as link to i44.tinypic.com show, even the less bizarre route goes to length to AVOID the bike trails.

    I sent an email to the Openfietsmap guy (girl?) after seeing Changren Yong’s post but haven’t gotten an answer. I’ll be happy to contribute some changes to OSM but am not sure which ones. For now, those maps certainly do not do a good job for bicycling around our trails… If it’s that bad in Basecamp, should I expect even worse on the device which has less CPU to compute the best route?

    Reply
    • Changren Yong replied

      Did you have avoid highway enabled? If so, that may be the reason Garmin is not routing it on bike trails as Openfietsmap considers bike trails as highway.

      Reply
    • Simon Poole replied

      We have a fairly active US community see link to openstreetmap.us I’m sure you can find somebody there that will show you the ropes (if necessary).

      As I pointed out earlier there are a number of different producers of GARMIN maps from OSM data, typically catering for different audiences both visually and for routing. You should probably give link to openmtbmap.org a try and see if that works better for your use.

      Simon

      Reply
    • Frenchman replied

      @Changren know it must have been an “avoid highway” thing. While there is no setting for it in Basecamp, if I redo the route using “Drive” as the activity I get a route on the trails. So I am assuming this is indeed what happened there. Great! I just received my micro SD card so I can try now on the Edge 800 itself.

      @Simon, thanks for the links. I know about openmtbmap.org (and velomap.org) but like the look of Openfietsmap a lot better than theirs, and wanted a way to get started quickly to try without getting into their premium content buy (I have a Mac).

      Is openstreetmap.us a good place to ask about things comparing both (for example it seems that Velomap may have global DEM while Openfietsmap does not in the lite version but I am not sure)?

      Reply
    • Frenchman replied

      @Changren do you still see your issue with “routable bicycle” with the latest maps from Openfietsmap? On the desktop at least now that I picked Drive to have highways the trails are hit… I may not be able to get close to the Burke Gilman trail for a while to test with the Edge.

      Reply
    • Changren Yong replied

      @frenchman I have not had any issue after disabling avoid highway.

      Reply
  46. Frenchman

    Replace MapSource with Basecamp in my previous message… Oops! Sorry!

    Reply
  47. Helen

    My computer won’t recognise the SD card. When I put card into Garmin 800 and connect to PC how do I know which file is the DS card to copy maps to?

    Reply
  48. Bruce

    My computer recognizes the SD card even when it is plugged into the Garmin. My problem is that the device itself doesn’t recognize the SD card. I am going to go back through chain of comments again to see if I can get the problem fixed.

    Reply
  49. Igor Glinsky

    Thanks Rainman! Awesome instructions, easy to follow. I got my Edge 800 yesterday, saw the “map” on it and thought – !@#$%^&* is this?!! Thank you for providing a free solution. Another hundred bucks for a real map would be maddening.

    Loved seeing W Lake Sammamish Parkway on the screenshots! (I live nearby/ work in Factoria, proud to have you in the region and hope to run into you on the trail)

    (Correction: hope to SEE you on the trail)

    Reply
  50. Jon Snider

    Ray, How do you add more than one state or country to the SD chip in the Edge? I downloaded Colorado and once it appeared as a 97.8MB file called “gmapsupp.img” I drug it into my Garmin folder and the maps were enabled on the Edge. But when I tried to add a second set of maps, of France where we’re going this fall, the same file name appeared, this time a 742MB file, which would not load when i drug it to the folder. I tried renaming the file “gmapsupp1.img” and then it would load in the folder but no France maps appear when I go to enable the maps, nor can I find any French locations such as cities etc. when i search. Thx.

    Reply
    • Rainmaker replied

      You’ll need to use the procedures I outlined within the Edge 810 review (around Basecamp to combine them, applicable to older Edges as well). That said, I thought someone said that you can now put multiple .IMG files named separately onto the Edge 810 with a more recent firmware. I just need to try it out.

      Reply
  51. Scott Millns

    I’ve been using OSM maps from talky toaster in the UK and they’re great. I just wish that you could route using addresses and postcodes in navigation but it’s not available.

    Reply
  52. Paul

    Help!
    downloaded map for trip to europe as i’ve already bought Britain and don’t want to spend the cash for europe now. followed instructions but my map downloaded as folder called OpenfietsmapLite.gmap I was expecting one large image but now have a folder of various things that my Garmin 800 won’t recognise.

    Reply
    • Craig replied

      It sounds like you downloaded the wrong file. You need to download the file named “openfietsmap_lite_gmapsupp.zip”. Then when you unzip that, it will contain a file named “gmapsupp.img”. So just copy that onto a memory card in the Edge, in a folder named “Garmn”.

      Reply
  53. Paul Davidson

    Should I opt to include the Mapnik TYP file from the OSM for downloading to my 810?
    What difference does it make to the view and to loading times?

    Reply
  54. Haroon

    Hi
    I use Macbook pro and did the above steps.
    Downloaded the image file
    Transfered it to garmin but it does not show it in the maps
    Any one who tried it on MAC OSX plat form?

    Reply
    • Haroon replied

      UPDATE: Solved!

      1- On Mac platform when you download the Openfeitsmap.zip file it downloads as “disk image” with extension .img (gmapsupp.img) in your downloads or documents folder (based on ur settings)
      2- IMPORTANT: Insert MicroSD card, it will show on you Mac desktop, click it, create a “folder” named “Garmin”
      3- Now drag the gmapsupp.img file into the “Garmin” folder in the MicroSD card
      4- Eject both Garmin and MicroSD
      5- Your maps on!!!

      I was simply dragging it on the MICROSD card and it was not showing, you got to create a FOLDER!

      Reply
    • Emma replied

      Thank YOU Haroon for posting this. It was the most helpful part of this thread for my problem. I am so glad you took the time to post this, I thought I was going mad. The simple solutions are often overlooked and rarely posted, so I thank you for saving my sanity!

      Reply
  55. I’ve hit a bit of a snag while trying to add a second map and am hoping you guys might know what I’m doing wrong. I’m currently getting the error message, “Cannot Authenticate Maps”.

    I’m interested in having three maps on my 800 – the AMR Standard base map (on the internal drive), the OEM CN North American NT (gmapsupp.img map 1.4mb), and an added Open file for North America, which I’ve named openmap.img (3.9mb).

    I’m using the 16mb card recommended in the article above and had the maps independently working when replaced the default map with the larger Open Map – then named gmapsupp.img. Since trying to run multiple maps, I’m hitting the snag. It appears that when I try to load everything to the SD card, the Garmin will be able to find only the AMR and Open maps – not the OEM “CN America NT”.

    Here’s what I currently have on my 16mb SD card when I access it via my computers SD slot (I get a lot more when I plug my Garmin unit it via USB).

    /Removable Disk
    GARMIN (folder contents listed below)
    pmp_usb config file
    winamp_metadata dat file
    winamp_metadata.idx

    /Removable Disk/GARMIN
    /Activities (empty folder)
    /Courses (empty folder)
    /NewFiles (empty folder)
    /Workouts (empty folder)
    gmapsupp.img (1.4mb default map)
    openmap.img (3.9mb Open map I created)
    grmn0.gma
    Gmapsupp.unl

    Any ideas what I’m doing wrong? Does it matter if I load the maps via SD port or via the 800 plugged in?

    Thanks,
    Matt

    Reply
    • Changren Yong replied

      Matt S:

      I think you got your unit wrong. The Garmin City Navigator map is about 1.4 GB (not MB). I don’t know the legality of moving the Garmin City Navigator map from the micro SD card that it originally came with to another micro SD card with larger capacity. But the reason why you are seeing the “Cannot authenticate map” message is because the Garmin map is hard-coded to that specific micro SD card. When you copy that map file to another micro SD card, your Edge 800 realize the map is not on the correct valid micro SD card. I believe Garmin did this to prevent piracy of its maps but it is a pain in the ass for people who legitimately own it and wants to move it to a micro SD card with larger capacity.

      There are ways to get round this but i am not going to post it here. You can google for it.

      Reply
  56. Paul Davidson

    I’ve ordered an 810 with City Nav Europe and the 1:50 UK Discoverer bundle. (not yet arrived).

    Will I be able to load OSM maps also?
    Will these have to be put on a separate card (not ideal to have to change cards if you want a different map)?
    Can the OSM maps be loaded onto the 810′s card? If so, is there any chance I could overwrite the City Nav EU or 1:50 Discoverer maps by accident??
    If not enough space on the 810′s card can I transfer the City Nav EU and 1:50 Discoverer maps onto a larger card and add on the OSM maps to the same card?

    Reply
    • Ray Maker replied

      You can mix maps, but you’ll need to use the steps outlined within the Edge 810 In-Depth review to dive into how to merge the two.

      (Note: It’s possible that the 810 allows manual adding of multiple maps on the unit without software, I just haven’t tested/validated that yet…sorry!).

      Reply
  57. Helen

    Hi,
    I followed the excellent instructions and successfully installed a map of France. I planned routes at home before the trip and loaded them successfully. After a day the Garmin stopped working…I’m wondering whether it’s possible there was something from OSM which could have corrupted files? Or whether this was just a co-incidence? Anyone else had a similar problem?

    Reply
    • Ray Maker replied

      I’d guess pure coincidence. If there was an issue, it would be related to loading the map upon startup, not mid-ride.

      Reply
  58. Aaron

    Great post Ray. Got to France and realised I’d had a Great Britain Discovery map bundled with my 810. Deleted the map file off it and replaced it with one I downloaded after following your instructions. Worked a treat.

    Many thanks

    Reply
  59. Paul Davidson

    Has Garmin Connect essentially replaced Basecamp if you use an 810?
    Is “Courses” in Connect the same/better/worse than Basecamp?
    I’m going to France for a few days this weekend and wondered how best to plot a route for me to follow….one that avoids the busy main roads and dual carriageways!

    Reply
    • Ray Maker replied

      Yes and no. It’s complex.

      Basecamp is definitely the core product for transferring maps to the unit (as opposed to Garmin Connect, which today can’t transfer maps). It’s also the product if you’re going to do any transferring of complex navigational waypoints – another area that Garmin Connect can’t do.

      For me, if it’s just a route, I prefer Garmin Connect – and especially with the Edge 810 because you’d be able to access those and transfer them from the web. Also, snap-to-road functionality is within the site and definitely better there.

      Reply
  60. Jacquie

    I’m trying to get some maps on my new Garmin. I downloaded the .zip file to my mac and it seems to have unzipped it for me, but there is no .img file. There’s a folder called Openfietsmap Lite.gmap containing a subfolder Product1 with yet more folders but no img file at all. Did I miss downloading something? Is there something else I need? I’m running OSM 10.8.4.

    Reply
    • Jacquie replied

      Forgot to say it’s an Edge 810.

      Reply
    • Changren Yong replied

      What is the name of the zip file you downloaded? If you downloaded the one for Mac OSX, that’s not the correct one if you wish to use Ray’s instruction.

      Reply
    • Jacquie replied

      I knew Ray’s were for a Windows system so I was trying to use Haroon’s from above. My downloads folder contains no executable files, no .zip file, no .img file. The instructions on the garmin.openstreetmap site are very vague–the zip file is described as an installer nothing installs.

      Reply
    • Changren Yong replied

      Did you download the file openfietsmap_lite_gmapsupp.zip? It does not matter if you are following Ray’s instructions or Haroon’s, this is the file you should be downloading. Depending on the browser and the setting of in your browser, it may unzip it automatically for you. I’ve configured Safari not to extract/open files automatically after being downloaded so any zipped file will remain compressed in the Download folder. If you situation is similar to mine, then you have to double-click on openfietsmap_lite_gmapsupp.zip to uncompress it. The resulting file should be called gmapsupp.img.

      Reply
    • Changren Yong replied

      Again, DO NOT download the file from Openfietsmap that says for MAC OSX. This file requires a couple of Garmin apps on the Mac in order to transfer the map to your Edge 810. This process is a lot more complicated than the instructions described in this post.

      Reply
  61. Jacquie

    Thanks, Changren. I’ll try that when I get a chance (which may not be for a week).

    Reply
  62. Changren – i have the same problem as Jacquie; i have got gmapsupp.img on my Downloads (on an Imac) but i cant open the file – i get the message ‘no mountable file systems’ – whatever that means!! Richard

    Reply
    • Changren Yong replied

      Richard, you don’t open the gmapsupp.img file on your Mac. It is the file you copy to the “garmin” folder on your micro SD card.

      Reply
  63. Thank you so much for taking the time to put this post together, I followed your instructions to create a map for my new Garmin Edge 810 (Which I bought without maps having found this post) Even though I build Ecommerce Software for a living, I must say that I was a little bit skeptical that it would all be as easy as to create maps as your instructions made out. None the less, I had a full set of maps for my local area in the UK within an hour (baking time), then went on to make a map which I will be using later on in the year on a cycling holiday to the Canary Islands. Brilliant thanks so much, I sent open street map a donation too, they saved me about £90 GBP! – happy days!

    Reply
  64. Thanks Changren – but i am still lost! this is all a bit sophisticated for me! i think i have copied it to my Edge – but when i check the maps it does not see it (it only sees the basemap). i have also had no luck trying to copy the City Navigator & GB Discoverer (which i purchased) onto my 16gb card – i gather you cant do this – hence i was trying to download a free map. i think i need to find someone more used to this technology – being in my 60s it is all a bit too up-to-date!! Richard

    Reply
    • Changren Yong replied

      Richard, did you copy the gmapsupp.img file to the “Garmin” folder on the micro SD card?

      Reply
  65. andrew

    just like to say thank you for a great post, my 705 is back in use!

    Reply
  66. Charles

    To get the maps to work on a 705

    On your card your should have 2 files
    GMAPSUPP.UNL
    GMAPSUPP.IMG (this is a map I purchased)

    I’ve renamed the GMAPSUPP.IMG to GMAPSUPP_UK.IMG and copied the new map file to the card and called it GMAPSUPP.IMG

    This shows up in the map settings as described in the tutorial

    Once I’m done with the current map I’ll rename the _UK map file back to the original GMAPSUPP.IMG

    Reply
  67. Chris

    Love the site, thanks! Two questions (for now). Just got a Garmin 800. If I want to have maps for two areas, say my home base and a vacation map would you just swap out the map file on the Garmin or can one of the maps be renamed as the maps have the same name. Or can you create a map with two separate areas. We vacation in the same spot. Secondly how often do update the map of your home base?

    Reply
    • Ray Maker replied

      Yes, you could swap out maps (simply have them handy on your computer). Or, you could go ahead and use the site above to build a big custom map set with your vacation spot and your home spot. Then you’d just have one map set.

      I don’t often mine that much…mostly because Paris roads don’t change too much these centuries. :)

      Reply
  68. Harrison

    Struggling to make this happen. My maps have been obtained. I have the gmapssup in a folder and on my desktop as well.

    The gmapssup have been transferred to my SD micro card, which has been inserted into my Garmin Edge 800. The Edge does not seem to give the new maps any attention. Any advice or tips? My maps do not even show up under “maps” in the settings tab. I have about 49mb worth of maps, so not to terribly much. I have my area here covered and another frequently visited vacation destination.

    Help please!?

    Reply
  69. Harrison

    Wait! I got it :)

    Much appreciated for this how-to-guide. Speaking of which, may I ask why it’s not featured in the “How To Guides”?

    Reply
  70. Beth

    Thank you so much for the info about how to upload the OpenStreet maps…such good advice and so easy to do, thank you.

    I am still not 100% sure how to search on location though and ask it to take me to a particular address, as it says that address/city can’t be found – any ideas?

    Reply
  71. Niki

    A big thanks to Ray for these great instructions on the map download! I`ve got the Edge 810 now for about a week, and since I got a little bit of time on my hands I started to play around with a lot of different maps to see the differences.
    First of course, I followed Rays instructions and downloaded the routable bicycle map from the suggested link. Everything works fine, but the thing that annoyed me (as a hiker AND biker) is, that there are no elevation lines included on these maps. (or did I miss anything?) I don`t know why, but I just love these lines…they let me easily spot a nasty hill in the area to circumvent :-) So, next I downloaded the maps from openfiestmap.nl, and these maps are great – they include elevation lines (I think this is how you call them, right?) and show great detail. However, the routing is not that great when compared with the original Garmin maps (even though mine are from 2009 and have never been updated…for obvious reasons…). In this case, I particularly compared the topo Austria (Garmin) with the Topos from the above mentioned pages.
    This is really my only complaint…the routing function (on the GPS device itself) is somehow weird, which I guess has to do with the attribution of certain trails. I don`t know if anyone has made the same observation, but when I use different modes (e.g. Hiking vs. Mountainbiking vs. roadcycling) the device selects sometimes forest trails with roadcycling or roads with the Hiking mode. It works so-lala, but not as good as with the original Garmin maps.
    I also downloaded the maps (both, velomap as well as mtbmaps) from openmtbmap.org after donating some money. Here my experience was even worse – the routing function does not differentiate between the various modi at all – even though all these maps are based on the OSM maps. So here goes my confusion.

    I now wonder, any suggestions out there in terms of really good, routable maps (for all uses, roadcycling, mountainbiking and hiking) including elevation lines? The openfiestmaps are already pretty good, but not amazing (instead of hiking I have to for instance use the “by foot” mode in order to walk on small trails). Also, very often I am getting routed along main roads instead of cycling tracks which are running parallel.

    Any help or suggestion is appreciated.
    Niki

    Reply
  72. richard

    is that possible to download the map that i wanted into my garmin fenix? if so, how can i do that ?

    Reply
  73. Rafael_Silveira

    Thanks a lot. Very, very helpfull.

    Reply
  74. Great post! As you say, there’s other ways to get the free maps, but this way is by far the easiest. That said, I’ve also downloaded Mantlik’s maps in order to be able to use the contour lines. I summed it all up in a post with screenshots of what the maps look like here: link to bikingbrian.com

    Reply
  75. Mitchell

    Help! I am new to loading maps on my Garmin 810. I downloaded the map for France onto my Mac and transferred the map gmapsupp.img into new files on my 16 gb micro SD card. The file shows up as being on the card when it is plugged in to my Mac but it does not appear on the Garmin 810 when I unplug from the computer and boot the Garmin. I only see AMR Standard Basemap, NR. What am I doing wrong? Thanks.

    Reply
  76. Changren Yong

    You are putting it in the wrong folder on the micro SD card. It should be the “Garmin” folder, not the “new files” folder.

    Reply
    • mitchell bitter replied

      Thanks! Just figured that out.

      Reply
  77. According to Highly Tuned Athletes owner Mr Rob Grinter all the problems I had with my Garmin Oregon 600 recently occurred because I was using OpenStreetMapping. The maps caused the following problems which I raised with Garmin International (ignored) and Highly Tuned Athletes. Apparently my use of <a href="link to openstreetmap.org was irresponsible and the cause of these issues as it seems it works fine for them at their store … (with those same maps installed BTW). I experienced all of the below whilst riding in the South-west of WA. It seems that the disclaimer at link to garmin.openstreetmap.nl where I download the maps from explains these issues.

    I have found Mr Grinter’s comments rather interesting given that these same maps worked fine initially, work fine in my Garmin Edge 810 and seemed to work fine at Highly Tuned Athletes store.

    Anyway just putting out there what I experienced and if you have a Garmin product and use Openstreetmaps and experience any issues you might want to remove the maps before returning the unit for investigation.

    The following is taken from my letter to Highly Tuned Atheletes.

    1. My Garmin Oregon 600 not synchronise with either of my Garmin GSC-10 sensors despite both advertising material and the manual indicating otherwise. Those same GSC-10 sensors synchronise with Garmin Edge 810 and previously with my Garmin Edge 800 so I know the issue is not with the sensor. Interesting the Oregon 600 will synchronise with my Adidas HRM strap. I consider this critical failure as it was one the features I lead to my purchase of the unit. Any replacement or repair must have this functionality working correctly please or there is little point in replacing or repairing the unit.
    2. The Oregon 600 has been inconsistent with its auto-pause function. Sometimes it will auto-pause sometimes it will not. The amount of tree coverage appears to have no influence on this. I have found that on more than one day, a day of riding could be recorded with approximately 60% being added to the day’s distance when compared to the map. I didn’t deviate from my planned route at all and hence this sort of error level is extremely concerning, more so if one is navigating and using distances as a critical navigation tool. I found the only solution to this was to physically turn off the unit whenever I stopped.
    3. In contrast to the issues raised in dot point 2, I found I could be riding along when the Oregon 600 would simply go into auto-pause mode. This was a known fault in early firmware updates of the Garmin Edge 800 and which was fixed so it is staggering to see it happening again now with a much more modern unit in the Garmin range
    4. I found the Oregon 600 showings speeds up to 30 to 40 km/h when I am doing 10 km/h or less and again in situations where often there was little to no tree coverage. On one day it recorded a maximum speed of 90 km/h! I was riding a loaded mountain bike on dirt trails where my average speed would have been around 10 km/h over the day.
    5. The Garmin Oregon 600 route tracking gets confused following a turn in the road or trail and often then heads off showing me going well off-track and adding considerable distances to the day’s ride distance.
    6. On more than one occasion it would simply just recorded me heading off into the wilds for no apparent reason;
    7. My Oregon 600 regularly looses satellites even in clear tree coverage (e.g., riding in farming country). When this occurs I have to use the auto locate satellites feature to re-locate the satellites. When I do this the Oregon 600 finds the satellites within seconds. On some days this was happening up to 15 times over a six to eight hour ride. In my view this is a very serious concern as surly a company such as Garmin Limited with a history of GPS development should have such a fundamental functionality working correctly.
    8. If I switch to external power source (e.g., USB battery supply) it causes the Oregon 600’s screen to change to a different display and at times simply changes the chosen the profile! It simply seems to have a mind of its own.
    9. I found that a set of Duracell Ultra alkaline batteries I tried (fresh purchase) lasted no more eight hours which is well short of the claimed battery life. I was getting similar battery life times from a rechargeable batteries as well;
    10. My Oregon 600 will at least once a day randomly turn off;
    11. My Oregon 600 will lock up requiring the removal of the batteries to force it to restart again seemly on a random basis;
    12. Tones continue to sound even though they have been turned off in the settings
    13. Updating to firmware 2.8 resulted in the lost of the geocaching profile as per our email discussions.

    Regards
    Andrew

    Reply
  78. This is excellent!

    I have a 800 and travel a lot. I have a mac and just have a folder on my desktop with various maps from around the world. Found that my 800 doesnt like 2 maps at a time so I just delete any off the card Im not using and have them backed up on my desktop folder.

    Example: Yesterday was in Thailand so I had the thai maps and nothing else. Today in NYC and have the NYC maps and nothing else. All my maps are on my mac so can delete and add anything to my micro SD card ‘garmin’ folder anytime.

    Im pretty computer illiterate but found the support in this thread very helpful. Especially Mr Yong.

    Reply
  79. sandy

    Thanks for this great help. On my new Edge 800, I find no problem downloading multiple map files to the SD card. To do this, you have to give each file a different name, but the 800 seems only to use one file named GMAPSUPP to do routing. So I give the files I am not using temporary other names, such as GMAPSITUPP for Italy and rename the file I want to us as GMAPSUPP. This lets me store my files on the SD card in the Garmin, and just takes a minute on a computer to change the map file names when I change locations. This seems easier than creating the “one big map” each time I want to add something, but keeps the files handy and ready to go. Is there an easier way to do this?

    Reply
  80. Ken

    Thanks! Worked great!

    Reply
  81. Pete

    I had thought it would help the Edge 800 to run faster if I had separate smaller files for each area I wanted to cycle in. I created two small files, renamed them and uploaded them to the SD card. Garmin calls them both Openfietsmap and seems to load them both.
    How can I identify them as separate files so I can select them individually? Does it make any difference to the speed of operation?

    Reply
    • davep replied

      The name the Garmin displays is from inside the file. It might be possible to change it but not very easily. Anyway, I doubt it matters for speed: the Garmin isn’t doing anything with the name beyond displaying it.

      By the way, from my investigation, the “openfiets/bicycling” versions do not produce very good routing if you are in the US. (That is, when you use the Garmin like a car nav unit to compute a route to a destination).

      If you use the Garmin to compute routes, you might consider using the normal (non openfiets/bicycling) versions of the OSM and use “avoid highway”.

      Reply
  82. Soe

    Hello there,

    I am in a bit of a blind panic. I am not the most technical person in the world but I bought an Edge 800 expecting it to have routable maps on it. After forking out a fortune i realised it has none and I am currently t-2 days away from a bike ride from London to Berlin, where we were expecting to load the routes on to the Garmin. A few questions, do I need to have the SD card, can i just download on to my MacBook Pro and then transfer over? I have asked for whole of the UK, parts of Holland and Germany. When do you reckon i can get it all done by.

    Reply
  83. Daryl

    This was so nice of you to do all this work! I really appreciate it.

    Reply
  84. Jorge

    Thanks for the info and the tutorial.
    Is there any way to put the file on the garmin, not the sdcard?
    Thank you

    Reply
    • Barry replied

      It depends on the device and how much room is available. I put the files directly on the device using a garmin 705 but on the 810 there is no room.

      Reply
  85. I am one of the guys behind http://ridewithgps.com – just wanted to jump in here and mention we also sell these cards cheap on our site. We were helping people with instructions like this (though not nearly as detailed) and many were having problems, so we started making these in bulk. $25 gets you a region loaded onto a 8gb card, and shipping is less than a buck in the USA. Sorry if this is a shameless plug, we don’t make a ton of money on these we just offer them for the convenience of our users:

    link to ridewithgps.com

    Reply
  86. John

    Thanks so much for all the time and effort you have put in to this ( and other ) tutorials they are invaluable for people such as myself.
    Could I just ask do you know if this is street only or will it navigate off road like the garmin trail maps do as I only ride off road?

    Reply
  87. George

    Hi Ray, I followed your tutorial step by step but the Edge 800 says “Cannot unlock maps”
    What do I do wrong?
    Thanks
    George

    Reply
  88. Aaron

    What program do you open the unzipped file with? When I put my SD card into my Edge 800 it does not register that I added anything.

    Reply
    • Rainmaker replied

      You just place the unzipped file on the card within the Garmin directory. You can’t place the ZIP fie there though, you need to unzip it first.

      Reply
  89. Doug

    I’ve struggled with doing turn by turn ride with my 705 even after buying the east and west north American maps from RWGPS. I’ll upload the ride, get going then it’s telling me to make a u-turn or make a wrong turn then there a map lines all over the screen. Garmin support sux and RWGPS has been tough as well.

    Any advice, forums I can go to? Could it be the maps, the 705? feel as if I’m missing something simple. Any help would greatly appreciated.

    Reply
    • Rainmaker replied

      Yeah, I don’t have really any experience with RWGPS. But, there tends to be a fair bit of folks willing to help out in the Garmin forums – forums.garmin.com, which may be a good option to try and troubleshoot.

      Typically speaking, if you’re getting wonky directions, then the base mapset may be a problem. The good news is that trying the free solution above doesn’t cost anything (maybe $10 if you don’t have a spare MicroSD card around), but may be a quick way to eliminate one of the two items as the core issue.

      Reply
    • Doug replied

      I tried to download the maps listed with the instructions but just couldn’t get the conversion from one form to another. Mind you I have a new Windows 8 machine and was using an old XP pro laptop that was damn near ten years old..

      Reply
  90. LitterBugs

    If you would like free topo maps for your 800/810 you should check out link to gpsfiledepot.com . You will need to download install each state individually into Garmin basecamp and then generate a file to upload to your gps. There is a bug with installing in windows7-64 bit which requires downloading and installing a small trail map such as link to gpsfiledepot.com first. Enjoy and happy cycling!

    Cheers!
    LitterBug

    Reply
  91. Nicos

    Does this work on the edge touring devices as well?

    Reply
  92. Ma Ol

    Tnx for this great site!

    Reply
  93. Santosh Bosch

    I have a Garmin edge 705, wich map do i have to download? I have allready downloaded the bicylce map in zip file but that isn’t working. Can somebody help me ?

    Reply
  94. DJMJ

    I have a Garmin Edge 800 and I’ve tried everything, but can only see the preinstalled basemap on my device.

    Menu > Wrench Icon > System > Map > Map Information/Select Map > Enabled – Worldwide DEM Basemap,NR

    I’ve tried reformatting the disk. That didn’t help. Just installed a brand new 8 GB Sandisk card, made a “Garmin” folder, and put the “gmapsupp.img” file in it. Still only the basemap.

    This what is on my Garmin and card -

    Garmin Edge 800>
    Documents (folder)
    Garmin (folder)
    autorun.inf
    Upload to Garmin Connect (internet shortcut)

    Garmin (folder)>
    13-folders (Activities, Backgrounds, Courses, Debugging, Locations, NewFiles, Schedules, Settings, Sports, Text, Totals, Weight, Workouts)
    Device.fit
    GarminDevice.xlm
    Garmintriangetm.icon
    gmapbmap.img
    gmapbmap.sum
    gmaptz.img
    startup.txt

    If anyone could compare these files, etc and tell me what I need to do to get the OSM maps to load I would really appreciate the help.

    Reply
  95. Jonathan

    Hi there,

    I successfully downloaded the UK earlier in the year, but has since returned by broken 705 and received a reconditioned 705 from Garmin. I bought a new SD card but since downloading the maps, I can no longer view the maps when I open the Garmin 705. I’ve copied the gmapsupp file onto the SD card and even the actual device, but I can only see the basemap – anyone out there know why?

    Johnny

    Reply
    • Johnny replied

      Problem solved. Reformatted the SD card last night and that solved the problem. I, once again have all the uk on my garmin, happy days. :-)

      Reply
  96. Thanks for the easy to follow instructions. I’ve followed your instructions and loaded maps of the Bodensee area to my Garmin Edge Touring so I can vouch for it working with this model as well.

    Reply
  97. symon

    I have just started downloading the OSM for the USA, and it wants to take “more than 12 hours”! That sound right to you?

    Reply
  98. Doug

    I’m real close to throwing my 705 in the trash. I bought a eastern North America map from ‘Ride with GPS’ and it sucks. I’ll map a ride then take off and with in just a few minutes it starts telling me to make a u turn or deviates way off course. Garmin has ZERO customer service and these instructions seem to go over my head.

    Really, REALLY frustrating. This thing was supposed to take stress out of long rides not make them a hassle.

    Reply
    • Rainmaker replied

      I don’t know much about Ride with GPS, other than that they take free maps and re-package them for profit. Sorry!

      You could try the map instructions here (all free) and see if that helps.

      Reply
    • Chris Gottlieb replied

      See if there is a setting about navigate to start. I had similar issue with my 800. I was on the route but it wanted me to go to the start of the route and I had jumped on in the middle. Also if it asks you to allow re-calibration say yes. I used a route for the first time last week and it worked great. Try setting up something around your house or neighborhood till you get it figured out. Good Luck.

      Reply
    • Doug Weaver replied

      Chris did you download the map from this site?

      And mine either starts me over or attempts to have me u turn and take a route I’ve never seen and the BEST was getting SEVERAL routes all around me!

      I’ll give the instructions provided by DC Rainmaker one more go than I’m back to the old Map My Ride app on my ‘smartphone’ which as of last time I checked they didn’t have turn by turn available which is what led me to the Garmin.

      Reply
  99. Barry

    It seems unlikely the Ride with GPS maps are the problem. It sounds like a problem navigating a route. Doug, have you read all the help on the ride with GPS site for how to navigate? How does the unit work if you just ride without navigating?

    Reply
  100. seba

    This is absolutely great.

    Reply
  101. Smitty

    You mentioned in your – excellent – article that it is possible to place maps directly onto the Garmin (not on a MicroSD card), but didn’t explain any details. Since I have just received my Garmin Edge 810, I thought I would comment that this is trivially simple.

    Connect your Garmin via USB.
    Copy map file into the Garmin directory.
    On Linux this will be /MOUNT_POINT/Garmin
    On Windows this will be REMOVABLE_DRIVE:\Garmin

    You can try this simply with a single map tile from OpenStreetMaps as discussed in your article

    The Edge 810 that I received presents one storage device which reports 110260224 bytes in size. Just under half of that is already used by default data files on the device. That means you have a mere 5 6Megabytes remaining. Assuming you want the Garmin to track, and store data about your activities, this will be further reduced, I would imagine it is reasonable to expect that you could load a map of 35-40 Megabytes and still have enough space for the other stuff.

    So, how big geographically is a map 35-40 Megabytes ? That’s not so easy to say because it depends upon the information density within the map. For example, Half of the North Atlantic Ocean and southern tip of Greenland (link to osm.pleiades.uni-wuppertal.de) is only 5 Mbytes, whereas the City of Munich Germany (link to osm.pleiades.uni-wuppertal.de) from is about 7 Mbytes. The entire state of New York would require approx. 75 Mbytes. Still, having four or five tiles composed into one map image is perfectly reasonable, especially if you are using the device for sporting activities, since you are unlikely to require more than 2 or 3 tiles per day, unless your sport is something to do with a motorized vehicle (IOW – not really a sport)

    Reply
  102. Smitty

    Forgot to mention. You can also free up additional disk space on the Garmin by deleting unnecessary foreign language files.

    There are 2 locations:

    GARMIN_DEVICE/Documents/Files/pdf
    Contains the same document in multiple languages.

    GARMIN_DEVICE/Garmin/Text
    No idea what these are, but clearly they are the same information in multiple languages as well.

    I deleted everything not English, and now have 94 Mbytes free space. That’s more than enough for the entire map of New York State previously mentioned.

    Reply
  103. Julian

    Got a new 16gb class 10 card for my 810 and , using my Macbook, downloaded the openfietsmap (both supp zip and macosx.zip) to the Garmin folder. The card is formatted with FAT32 and I can see it on the card.

    When I put the card into the 810 and follow the instructions all the unit shows is AMR standard base map NR.

    Between downloading the OSM, then deleting them from the card and the open stream email request route I’m about 24 hours into this process and about to throw it out the window. Please help!

    Reply
  104. Julian

    This goes from bad to worse. Now my Strava account doesn’t even find the device! I have uninstalled and installed the Garmin Communicator plug in AND the web updater to no avail.

    This is crazy.

    Reply

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