13 responses

  1. Baruch
    March 8, 2011

    I think you could even have a spin around the block aith one of these on the bike? Do a hill workout on a flat course…

    Reply

  2. Mr. A
    March 8, 2011

    Erector sets made this possible. Right? I saw that and all I could think of was that.

    Reply

  3. Anonymous
    March 8, 2011

    That looks like it would have been useful on rollers, which had almost no resistance. Kids and their trainers today will never know what’s like to crash on their trainer!

    Reply

  4. Chad
    March 8, 2011

    1. I think it’s beautiful.
    2. What’s anon talking about? My rollers have tons of resistance.

    Reply

  5. bryspald
    March 8, 2011

    How cool. Wonder how this matches up with the traditional dynamo-kit used to power the slightly illuminated area directly in front of my bike from almost the same time period.

    Reply

  6. Mark Liversedge
    March 8, 2011

    Totally awesome. Love it.

    Reply

  7. Brandon
    March 8, 2011

    What if you set this up on your bike on normal road rides? Liek Baruch said, it would add more resistance to your daily rides giving some resistance to your daily rides…

    Reply

  8. Eric
    March 8, 2011

    Awesome! I used one of these all the way into the ’90s to train on my rollers (old school steel rollers of course). They were definitely a trick to set up, and easily damaged too.

    Reply

  9. bmatt
    March 9, 2011

    Pretty Sweet setup. Definitely kills the aerodynamics of a modern bike.

    Reply

  10. wari
    March 9, 2011

    > However, based on our playing around with it – the overall resistance is nowhere near what a modern day trainer can provide.

    BUT, you can always us it to add additional resistance to your current trainer or ride if you’re feeling like a man :)

    Reply

  11. Roger
    May 18, 2011

    I can send you the original length rails for that, if you want them. Can replace the bearings, shaft, fans. Still have other parts too. The rails were made to be cut off if you needed to to clear the seat.

    That is the original Windload Simulator and was very popular in-the-day and could in-fact be used on the road, but would wear out the roller pretty quickly with all the little rocks you picked up.

    Long dead before the time of the Internet – hence little that the oracle or Google could find.

    Actually, it follows the exact same load curve as riding a bike on a level road at speed (AKA windo-load). No more that that, but the faster you go, the more load it makes.

    Reply

  12. J
    March 12, 2012

    Those came with a rubber strap that was perforated like a belt. It came with a hook that attached to the brake bridge of older frames. The other end of that same piece was also a hook of sorts that after you threaded the belt around one of the “bars” above the roller. That is how resistance was applied. It could apply alot of resistance or a little depending on how felt that day. I loved mine when I was using it.

    Reply

  13. scott
    May 12, 2016

    This is the gold standard of wind trainers. Yes it is noisy but the action of the fans is to pull down the unit onto the tire- hence no slipping. I used one when it first came out and went on to my best year ever in racing. Maybe I’ll surf eBay for one now :)

    Reply

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