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A few quick thoughts on the bePro Gen2…err…Favero Assioma

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Earlier this week bePro announced their 2nd generation power meter.  Well, actually, they didn’t.  A company called Favero announced something called the Assioma, which is the successor to the bePro power meter pedals announced almost exactly two years ago.  See – while most folks know them as the bePro pedals, the company isn’t bePro at all – but rather Favero.  And these new pedals carry with it a new name – the Assioma.

That clarity providing moment aside, there’s actually some really good news in there.  Assuming things end up being accurate of course (which as always, is a big question).  The price – at 799EUR (or $900USD) is very competitive, just like it was before.  But more importantly is that now the previously laborious installation is gone, and the limitation to being just ANT+ is also gone.  Both were the primary limiters of the product.

But let’s not get too far ahead of ourselves.  I’ll note that I don’t yet have a unit in-hand, but a pile of you have been asking about this – so this will serve as a placeholder (thus, this is *not* a review).  I’m told I should have a test set shortly though.  So once I do I’ll start posting accuracy data from it. With that, let’s talk geeky.

The Tech Details:

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In many ways, the pedal looks fairly similar to the first pedal.  It’s a relatively thin Look KEO-compatible pedal with a small pod at the end which acts as the battery and communications pod.  But looks can be deceiving.  The first item of note here is that the installation is no longer wonky-ass.

Yes, wonky-ass.

That’s what I’d describe the previous installation process as, which required special tools, stickers, and a bit of fairy dust.  Now though, the company is saying it’s just the same as any other pedal – simply screw it in and you’re good to go.  Or basically, the same as the PowerTap P1 is.

FaveroAssiomaInstall.gif

That, in and of itself, is great news for anyone looking at pedal based options.  Of course – do keep in mind that I still wouldn’t recommend doing this every day.  It’s a common question I get about other pedal based power meters like the PowerTap P1, Vector, etc… Ignoring any settling in period (sometimes upwards of a ride after moving between bikes), you’re just frankly bound to screw up one day and strip the threading.  If you’re swapping pedals every single day (people do ask), then you’re likely trying to use it bike commuting and it’d be really easy to accidentally get some sand or grit into the threads and then be up crap-creek.

Still – swapping each week for some reason?  That’s likely fine if done carefully.

In any case, back to the tech specs.  The exterior shell now includes status lights, which can be used for charging status as well as validation that all is well:

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Speaking of charging, the new unit now gets 50 hours of battery life (compared to 25-30 previously).  Charging is also done via a new connector that should improve integrity of the pod.  Previously it was a micro-USB connector directly on the pod.  Whereas now they’ve got a small charging adapter that removes the risk-point of micro-USB in that region:

FaveroCharger

Next, we’ve got connectivity.  Previously the bePRO pedals were ANT+ only.  While in the grand scheme of things that wasn’t a big deal then, it’s more limiting now, especially with folks that may want to use it on apps like Zwift on an iPad or Apple TV.  The Assioma pedals are now dual ANT+/Bluetooth Smart.  And the company has confirmed that, unlike WatTeam, they’ll be able to transmit dual concurrently.  That way you can hook them up to your Garmin Edge via ANT+ while concurrently transmitting to Zwift on an iPad.  Or whatever floats your configuration boat.

Like before on the ANT+ side you’ll get power, power balance (left/right), cadence, torque efficiency, and pedal smoothness.  While on the Bluetooth Smart side you’ll get power, power balance (left/right), and cadence.  Of course, we’ll have to wait and see what adoption looks like from companies like Polar, Suunto and even now Garmin for support of these units over Bluetooth Smart.  Traditionally we see it taking a few months (or longer) until the quirks are worked out.

In addition to transmission of your training data over Bluetooth Smart, you’ll be able to use their new smartphone app to update the firmware of the unit as well as set the crank length.  The crank length is important for power meter head units that may not properly support it.

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Lastly, moving onto some mechanical pieces.  The total weight per pedal is 149.5g.  To compare, a PowerTap P1 pedal with battery weighs about 206g.  Garmin Vector 2 per pedal weighs 179g.  So definitely the lightest out there.

The Favero pedals are designed to operate between –10°C and 60°C.  If for some reason you’re riding at 61°C (or anywhere near there), I suggest you consider medical assistance.  Meanwhile, –10°C just means you’re Canadian.

Assioma has a rider weight limit of 125KG or 275LBS.  Garmin Vector 2 has a rider weight limit of 90KG or 200LBS, while the PowerTap P1 has no rider weight limit.

Below is a large pile of other technical specs (click to zoom in), none of which are too much of a surprise.  They’re all pretty much in line with other power meters on the market:

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Finally, I do want to note there are actually two new products here.  There’s the Assioma Uno and Duo pedals.  The Uno pedal is the single-sensor power meter option, offered in left pedal only (but it includes a blank right pedal).  While Duo includes the dual left/right pedals with power meter sensors in both of them.

Favero Assioma UNO € 499 (VAT inclusive)
Favero Assioma DUO € 799 (VAT inclusive)

Update: Favero is going to separate it’s pricing scheme here more than first noted – one price for EU inclusive of VAT.  And then another price for non-EU excluding VAT.  So in the US for example, the prices are effectively as follows:

Favero Assioma UNO € 409.20 ($459USD)
Favero Assioma DUO € 654.92 ($735USD)

As you can see – that makes it even before competitive price-wise.

Currently the availability plan is July, but that sounds fairly tentative.  They are more confident in ‘by end of summer’.

(Minor FYI on Favero pricing: The company actually doesn’t price any products in non-EU currencies.  Instead, everything is priced in Euros – given Italy is in the EU – and retailers around the world can convert accordingly from there based on exchange rates.)

(Secondary FWIW: Yes, I suspect most people will mispronounce Assioma.  It’ll likely just be shortened in bike shops to the Ass Pedals. Which has a very memorable ring to it. There’s no such thing as bad PR, or something like that, right?)

Going forward:

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So, is this a PowerTap P1 killer that some people are suggesting?  Well, the answer is more complicated than it may seem.  First off, there’s the accuracy piece – the Assioma has to be accurate.  But I’ll give the benefit of the doubt to the Favero crew, so for the sake of discussion presume it will be accurate.  Most companies on their 2nd generation power meters tend to get it right (not always, but almost always).

The second piece is that some folks will prefer different aspects of shape/size.  For example, the PowerTap P1 is chubbier/heavier – but lacks the pod-thingy at the end.  Whereas the Assioma is thinner/light in the pedal, but has the pod in between the pedal and crank.  Same goes for battery differences.  Some people prefer AAA (PowerTap P1), while others prefer re-chargeable (Assioma).  I’m personally good with either of these two tradeoffs in this case – so not really an issue to me one way or the other.

The next piece is whether Favero can keep it (or get it) in stock.  It’s something that Favero struggled with for much of the first year of the bePro pedals the first time around – with lead times well into the many months for much of that time period.  Now, that was also true of the PowerTap P1 pedals.  And even to this day PowerTap is still struggling to make enough of them – with it floating out of stock every once in a while.

Last but not least we’ve got price.  Using simple exchange rate math – the Assioma is basically $900 – or a solid $300 below the PowerTap P1 units.  For almost everyone, that’s a big enough difference that they’ll overlook the pod thing and assuming accuracy is spot on – they’ll go Favero over PowerTap.  But that ignores whether or not PowerTap can simply lower their price.  My bet is they can quite easily.  After all – they haven’t had to lower their price at all since announcement two years ago.  They no doubt manufactured the product with thinner margins, and I suspect they could easily go to $999 or match at  $899.

(Update June 7th, 2017: For US customers, the price will actually be lower – effectively $735USD, as Favero will be pricing products there without VAT and since the US doesn’t have a VAT import fee – it’ll make the Assioma incredibly well priced.)

I would think $999 is probably a safe bet for now, since you’d be paying the extra $100 for a bigger company with more global distribution and support reach (Update: Favero says that starting with Assioma they’ll have a US service center as well).  But…you won’t see that price adjustment happen anytime soon.  Not until they see a reason to do so.  In the same way that nobody reacted to WatTeam initially upon announcement.  Instead, new entrants have to prove their product is accurate and manufacturable.  Until then – all competitors will wait in the wings before adjusting price.  Thus I think the earliest would be Eurobike 2017 (end of August) for any price adjustment by anybody.

Still – I’m definitely excited about Assioma – especially given the price point and the fact that the company made a very solid Gen1 product in the bePRO pedals.  Looking forward to it.

With that – go forth and enjoy your power meter decisions for the summer!  I’ve got a plate of previously announced new power meter entrants either on bikes or in the mail – so by the time we get to Eurobike/Interbike in the fall, I should be in a good spot to have my Annual Power Meter Recommendations guide posted.

Have a good weekend!

Update June 8th: You can now pre-order the pedals from Clever Training (US) here.  Don’t forget to tack on the DCR Reader 10% discount code of DCR10BTF, and you’ll also get free US shipping too.  They’re also working to get the Clever Training Europe links lit up as well. 

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71 Comments

  1. Bill

    Is there ever a chance of a shimano based power pedal coming to market?

    • Graham

      Do you mean Shimano-made or just Shimano-compatible? If the latter, wouldn’t Garmin Vectors with the Shimano Ultegra cartridge work for you?

  2. Sara

    Ray, any comments from the company is their first bePro would be upgradable to a similar firmware, and allowing a similar install without the extra nut?

    Not that is a deal breaker, but would be nice. I’ve been enjoying their Gen1 version for over a year and have switched them between bikes. I don’t use the stickers anymore and can do the alignment just fine without them, but it would be great to make them even simpler.

  3. John

    Still waiting for a walkable/SPD-style pedal based power meter. :-/

    • Karl

      Look / Keo with their city or touring shoes approximates this but due to the design the cleat angle isn’t adjustable.

  4. I’d really like these if they made them Speedplay compatible.
    Don’t know why any other pedal system even exists :P ;)

    • Amen, brother. Someone, somewhere out there must be working on a Speedplay-based power meter…

    • theboxers

      Sorry replied to wrong comment

    • Brent Gustafson

      +3

    • yancey arrington

      Speedplay are notoriously litigant against 3rd party manufacturers of compatible bits. They would have to rely on speedplay for IP, licensing and manufacturing component support. Risky from business point of view.

      I doubt there is a sneaky way to manufacturer speedplay clone pedals and cleats without coming into a big lawsuit with speedplay.

    • Yancey is correct. It’s incredibly unlikely it’s going to happen until Speedplay does it itself. In fact, it’s similarly the very reason that other companies don’t actually do Look-Keo branded pedals/cleats, but rather 3rd party variants. For example Garmin with Exustar, and PowerTap/bePro with Wellgo cleats, etc…

      Garmin talked about it quite a bit back at the original Vector launch. And we saw Brim Brothers often talk about the Speedplay challenges as well.

    • Wayne

      I believe that it can be done but it would take deep pockets.
      Speedplay does like to sue but they don’t always win. They lost their suit against Bebop but did make Bebop spend itself out of business. Sad because Bebops were basically better Speedplays without the plastic parts and actually smaller & lighter and cleared sand better too.

      If Panasonic wanted to do it I think they could. They would have much deeper legal pockets than Speedplay.

  5. Dave Lusty

    I have Aspergers and wine on board so the following is probably meant less negatively than you’ll read it…
    In Favero’s defense on the stock issue, your previous review which called into question their durability probably made it hard to plan (and we never really saw durability issues AFAIK).Your continued obsession with their “pod” too will probably hinder the company (smaller and less vulnerable than Garmin pods though?), although you seem fine with the MASSIVE battery compartment on the P1. The reasoning has been sound up until now – P1 allows easy pedal swaps and BePro was harder than 6 year olds could manage. The above though, reads as someone who loves the P1 and wants PowerTap to win so be very careful not to kill this one without good reason, it does seem like they’ve fixed everything and even the old one was accurate so no need to call that out quite so much. I’ve avoided both because the BePro had poor reviews (yours and others!) and the P1 had stupid cleat compatibility (yes, thats a HUGE issue to a lot of us) for no good reason as well as a stupid massive battery box. I’d rather swap mildly complicated pedals than cleats any day of the week!
    You’re a generally quite impartial reviewer Ray, but when you have a preference it does show through. That’s kind of a good thing; pure, cold science isn’t usually great but I’ve felt the BePro suffered unnecessarily from your review especially given the massive price gap. Maybe the BePro was rubbish but I’ve not seen huge complaints? I fully trust your instinct though, you spend a lot of time using this stuff and if it weren’t for the massive issues with P1s I’d have spent the extra money on your word. As it is I still have not bought a power meter. I bought 4 new bikes instead :) Hopefully either the new Favero will be great or PowerTap will sort out their issues this year and start using standard cleats and smaller batteries. I won’t be dropping £1k on either until things improve – at the end of the day they are fancy pedals!

    • You’ve had too much wine Dave. ;)

      I literally only mention the pod size thing a single time – and it’s in the same sentence where I call out the PowerTap P1’s chunky size. I note it as a trade-off between those two.

      The reality is some people prefer one or the other, as I noted in that section. I personally prefer no pod and a single unit design. Just my preference as one who takes on and off pedals constantly and knows that more dangling parts are more things to break.

      I’m not sure which bePRO review you read. I gave it good marks, but questioned the durability at the time (after all, my unit did crack open). I’ve since noted in subsequent annual power meter summaries that people seem good with it over the long-haul. Would seem kinda odd for me to omit it cracking in a review, since that’s kinda a big thing, no? Still, I don’t think anyone would read my bePro review as saying I gave it bad marks. It did well in accuracy, and was priced well.

      So yes…too much wine. Have a good weekend!

    • gabor

      Dave,

      You missed some important issues from the reviews. (in the meantime I read Rays answer, so I mention just what is missing)

      Cleat compatibility:
      BePro/Assioma shares the SAME CLEAT as P1. Yes, they have the SAME compatibility issue. It was never mentioned, but I still assume that the P1 pedal body is made actually by Xpedo, as the BePro/Assioma body is definitely made by them. They can be used with Keo cleats, but not optimal. This is true for all of the three pedals! Actually I think that Xpedo cleats are far superior than Keo cleats.

      It was discussed earlier somewhere, that for US based people, the price difference is not so much between P1 and BePro. At least not enough to seriously think about buying BePro, if P1 is plug and play.

      As a happy P1 user, and I have the P1 for more than a year, and I love it, I would say, that if the specifications are true, you should wait for the Assioma. For much less money the same functionality, and a bit more. PowerTap never solved the Android issue completely. Yes, now P1 is upgradable via android phones, but crank length settings are still not solved.

    • SeanU

      Hi Gabor,
      the BePros are fully comaptible with Look Keo – P1 is not (which was the dealbreaker for the P1s for me – the dealbreaker for BePro was the lack of Bluetooth).
      The price difference in Germany is massive 1200€ (1350$) for P1 – 705€ (845$) for BePro (Source Powermeter24, one of the few sources where you can get the BePros).
      Reviews of both are excellent, even though P1 has much less.
      I personally don’t like the chunky size of the P1 at all (and I don’t like the pods of Garmins Vectors).
      Long story short – in Germany there is really nothing tipping the scale towards P1.
      p.s. I got a stages in the end because I don’t care about left/right balance (can’t change it anyway) and I refuse to change my Shimano Pressfit bottom bracket just because the PM-manufacturers ignore what 90% of the average riders have — Shimano Pressfit.

    • SeanU

      here the source for the cleat compability of BP:
      link to bepro-favero.com

    • gabor

      I know the compatibility claims from both manufacturer. Just common sense and experience tells me that something is not true. They share the same RC7 cleats. It is very unlikely that pedal release systems designed for the SAME cleat behave different. The design is not so complicated anyway…

      I used my P1 with Keo cleats this winter – no issues at all. However on my summer shoes I use RC7 cleats because the release is smoother, and the RC7 lasts longer (the rubber part disappears from Keo cleat in 2 weeks, while on RC7 it lasts forever)

      The cause of claim difference might be in law. In the US manufacturers should protect themselves from any possible issues, while is Europe people use more common sense.

      For me in Hungary the P1 was about 1100€, while BePro was 800€, and P1 could be bought immediately, while for BePro I had to wait for months. I went for the plug and play, the metal pedal body and the easy battery change. However PowerTap found the battery issue after that (no cheap alkalines allowed), so I switched to rechargeables. The recommended lithium batteries are way too expensive, and add a very high usage cost indeed.

    • Antti

      I used P1’s for a year and have since switched to BePro’s after the P1’s kept breaking down. I have hundreds of hours of training on both, so here are some initial thoughts:

      1. P1 and BePro use the EXACT same XPedo cleat, as other already pointed out.

      2. The BePro pod is not entirely problem-free design. It’s so big that it will hit the sole of some cheaper shoes. Shimano RP5 is one, and I personally switched to more expensive Shimanos with a slimmer carbon fiber sole. You can also add cleat spacers, but it’s a hassle. In any case, Favero has made the pod smaller in these new pedals, so the problem is solved.

      3. The installation of BePro is not difficult once you get the routine. However, I always wondered why the design couldn’t be such that the pod orientation just wouldn’t matter, like P1 and Vector2. Favero probably cut some corners and went for a simpler design with BePro, but this is now also solved in the new pedals.

      4. Other than the pod size and the somewhat tricky installation, BePro has been a solid product. My local dealer said that they have proved to be reliable as well. They’ve sold many and very few come back, unlike with P1’s which have had way too many failures. Favero essentially got it right on the first try, and with the obvious improvements in the design I’m personally excited.

    • SeanU

      AFAIK Powertap does not claim Look compatibility.

    • Graham

      For balance, Ray’s review was a strong factor that led to me buying the BePro pedals. They do have their downsides, but none of those were significant for me (I have a wonky ass myself, so don’t mind wonky-ass installs). So far they’ve been accurate (or at least consistent with a Powertap hub) and reliable. I like the look of the new ones – nice that they’ve slimmed the pod (very) slightly, and made the install simpler. The charging looks good too – I’ve not had any problems with the plastic flaps, but they do seem a bit crappy. By my reading, when Ray likes / dislikes a product then it does show (but, his opinion is part of why we read his stuff!), but he always explains why, so it’s easy to say “yeah, actually I don’t care about that aspect”, or “right – that one’s a dealbreaker for me”.

  6. From the exploded view with the instructions it seems this is serviceable by the user? My P1’s are now back at PT for some play in the bearings for which I have mixed information about wether that’s covered by warranty – the importeur says it is, but PT says bearings are covered only 6 month and after that it’s upwards of USD150 for maintenance… on the plus side for PT, the engineer who responded to my emails was very friendly and knowledgeable. If I (or my LBS) can service these without having to send back, for me that would put these way above the P1 just considering the running cost after end of warranty.

    • gabor

      According to Favero, it is totally user serviceable

      “The independent pedal body: which can be easily detached from the pedal axle (where the sensor is) and replaced if needed.”

      My P1 also developed some play, but according to PowerTap, it is still in the normal range. (within 1 mm play in and out is considered normal, anything more should be serviced)

      Regarding P1 bearing replacement, I was also wondering if it is covered by warranty or not. The tech spec clearly tells that bearings are not covered. However it seems that if you destroy the electronics with the bearing play, that makes the bearing a warranty issue.

      I heard only good things about Favero’s user service as well.

    • Marek

      Although the spares are a little pricey, good to see that they’re available:
      link to bike-components.de

  7. Greg

    What does the weight limit on the pedals mean? Is it more on the structural support side of things or from the accuracy side of things? or both?

  8. Thomas

    Plus one on spd-compatible pedal-based power meter. What I really like about this announcement is the left-only option. At this moment, cheap (accurate) power meters are difficult to take from bike to bike. This would be cheap enough to consider and have interchangeability written on it. If only it came also as a spd version…

    • theboxers

      Thats what I’ve been waiting for. Unfortunately the cycling industry can be a bit conservative in their outlook. They can’t or don’t want to see the market that is touring/commuting. I think they view spd as off road and are reluctant to put a system out there that is more likely to be damaged in that environment.

      I am in the market for a second powermeter and these may be it.

    • Thomas

      And I’m not even a touring/commuting market member. I do races. But I also do long day trips in the mountains that include short walks, I need to get to walk over train stations to get to the mountains, and I want to be able to use the same pair of shoes also on my mountain bike in order not to have to spend twice.

  9. Klaus

    I really like this Pedal Powermeters without glueing anything. Swapable between Bikes. But my prefered shoes are MTB shoes (for walking at a Tour) and therefore SPD pedals.

    Isn’t there any version? With Ant+/Bluetooth?

    Thanks.

    • Jevgenijs Bacula

      +1 Same question from me. I understand it rather niche product but still making some market research I don’t see any MTB SPD pedal based power meters.

  10. Marko

    Another pro to this pedal over Powertap is that they also have an Android app. Powertap has had two years to come out with an Android app and still hasn’t delivered, which is inexplicable.

  11. Jonathan

    Found the Favero Assioma online for $700US and ordered a set. I’ve been watching bePro prices all winter and spring, but patiently waited for the next generation as promised. Thanks to DCR staying ahead of the market trends and sharing good advice with everyone, I think I got the deal I’ve been looking for. I’ll post back in July after a couple rides. Thanks again to DCR for helping me find the power meter I’ve wanted.
    Jonathan

    • Kyle

      Care to share where you’re able to order from?

    • Jonathan F Laatsch

      PM24 VAT free to the US. It suggests 10-20 days shipping time which apparently starts after the release date. Favero’s site has a buy now link, 650€ (excluding VAT/shipping), but it only reports the release date, “this summer”

    • Kyle

      Yeah, that’s what threw me when you said $700. That site is actually listing a price of 700 euros, which is 800+ US.

      Edit – Today it’s up to 789 euro!?!?

    • Kyle

      Found it – Apparently that PM24 site will change up the price not only with what currency you select, but also with the language/locale selection. Doesn’t engender a lot of faith or good feelings about that vendor.

      To get the lowest pre-order price, you must select English (USA), not English/International in the upper-right corner. Blame Brexit.

    • Jonathan

      Email from PM24 today suggested to pre-order now and to expect the Assioma by the end of this month, written 6 June. Price varies with location as Kyle said based on EU taxes.

    • In chatting with them (Favero) today, they put that ‘end of June’ tidbit into the category of “there are lots of rumors people are posting, but most of them aren’t true”. That would be one of those not true ones.

      They’re still in the July-August timeframe for shipping.

    • As for the pricing differences you’re seeing, I got a bit more clarification on that. Essentially Favero is doing an EU price inclusive of VAT, and then a non-EU Price without VAT.

      So for US folks without VAT you get the non-EU price which works out to about $735USD (for the Duo), which is really damn impressive. Not that prices are still converted in real-time from Euros though.

  12. Karl

    Is there a summary anywhere of q-factor and stack height of the Vectors, P1s and these?

    • Antti

      The q-factor is essentially the same for all three, and the same as in Look Keos. Assioma, Bepro and Vector all have a stack height of 10.5 mm, which is also typical for road pedals. Essentially they feel the same as Look Keos, since the cleat and pedal dimensions are the same.

      P1 has a high stack height at about 14.5 mm due to the chunky pedal body. This is about the same stack height as Shimano MTB pedals. Having said that, I don’t personally believe it makes any real difference, but some people do think it’s a big deal.

    • Karl Billeter

      Thanks for the info Antti, I was curious. It’s definitely something I feel switching pedals, but that said, I’m not sure that there’s any positive or negative effect with the differences either :-). Maybe just a touch less fluid standing to pedal with higher stack and wider stance.

  13. Justin

    Ray, I was just looking for a new PM. I have been looking at the P1s and had them in my checkout basket with clever training. I came over here, see this write up and it got me thinking – any chance we will see a P1 v2 announced soon? I like you mention a possible price drop for the P1s by late summer. Thanks for your insights.

    • I don’t think so. I think at this point they’ve got no real reason to push forward a new product, since they can directly compete by just lowering price if required.

    • Graham

      Whilst I think that you’re probably right that there won’t be a v2 any time soon, I do think that there should be. I would have gone for the P1 pedals if it wasn’t for the fact that there are really quite a lot of reports out there of issues with battery caps, sensitivity to battery types, water ingress. Now, I know that there is always a high ‘internet noise:actual failure rate’ ratio with things like this, but it’s still hard to ignore. Combine that with the (stated, at least) slight Keo incompatibility and the heavy, chunky nature of them, and I think that there is real room for improvement.

    • I think you’ll see a new generation eventually, just not this year (per the question).

      Keep in mind that changes have occurred that people don’t realize. For example the battery cap design has changed, as have some early issues impacting play. The battery cap issue for some had the trickle-down (literally) impact of water ingress.

      Battery sensitivity is a tough one, and honestly affects every power meter company. It’s just that AAA batteries are so widespread and people really refuse to follow the directions, that it comes up. With something like a CR2032 battery, that’s less so. Inversely if you look at Verve with the Infocrank and the LR44’s, you start to see some issues there as well because of the options people have.

    • Howie

      My P1’s required replacement after water ingress (before the new caps) and after one of the pedals came *off* the spindle. This replacement set required servicing when one of the pedals completely stopped working. The new caps have prevented water ingress but the alloy is very soft and strips easily.

      Thus… I’m *very* curious about the Assioma Duo.

      And yes, I love that Ray’s preference shows through the immense amount of data and objectivity. …Ray, you know more about all this stuff than I can ever hope to so I trust and rely upon your judgments and recommendations, while also using the data you provide to align with my own preferences, desires, needs, and intuition.

  14. Nicos

    I have read some rumours on Vector3 Ray…any idea?

  15. Markus

    I’m also super excited about these. I used to have the P1s. Those died twice within my 1.5 years of ownership. Each time they got replaced under warranty which was always a lengthy, tedious process over here in Germany(*). I guess they ship them to the US first. Since warranty was about to run out I sold off the second replacement pair.

    Here I see a great new option.

    (*) Just a suggestion for addressing how warranty issues are handled. This may be important for readers.

    • Howie

      In Germany you should be able to use Cyclepowermeters Limited in the UK. I’ve found the product manager, Matt Clinton to be extremely helpful.

  16. Aaron S

    Ray,
    Quick question – haven’t found this on your site yet, but do you see any MTB pedal (SPD) power meters on the horizon or in development? Inquiries I’ve made with Powertap have been “it’s a long ways off” or “we can’t really say anything to that affect right now”.
    In pure speculation on your part – how many months or years before we see a MTB/Cross SPD pedal based power meter in your opinion?
    thanks

  17. Thomas

    Wondering if PowerTap really would lower the prices. Since they are about to launch the P1S (left-only), this gives them a budget option, turning the Favero into some sort of a middle-option decoy.

  18. Jens

    Can you elaborate on the “…and even now Garmin for support of these units over Bluetooth Smart”?
    Is there a garmin unit with dual Ant&BLE coming and I missed that?

  19. Karim

    hello
    I apologize in advance if this is the wrong thread for my question…with that…

    I have a pair of P1 pedals (the dual power L/R) and up until recently they worked perfectly. I recently took a bike trip to Boone NC and packed the pedals (FYI I removed the the batteries during the flight) and they worked flawlessly on the trip. When I got back home I experienced some really wacky power numbers which I know were not accurate-new FTP of 400+ watts etc and numbers bouncing everywhere…in other words they were very erratic. I checked the firmware and they were current and every time I ride I calibrate the pedals on my Garmin head unit.

    Fast forward to last weekend and when I went for a ride the power numbers seemed to normalize and make more sense. My question is as follows:
    1 has anyone experienced this erratic behavior that has self-corrected themselves?
    2 I have a Wahoo Kickr 2nd gen and wanted to ask if there is software or website to compare the power numbers/files so see if the pedals are relatively accurate compared to the Kickr in other words are the pedals preforming properly?

    Any suggestions on how to set up the test/experiment and software or websites (preferably free) that you would recommend would be appreciated.

    FYI I recently replaced the stock batteries with new energizer lithium batteries…prior to my trip so the pedals were working properly prior to my trip with the new batteries….

    Thanks for reading.

  20. Dan

    So I followed the link to Clever Training and the Duo model is $899. I thought you mentioned in your update the the US pricing would be $735?

    • Dan

      Just checked again today and now the price is updated to $735!!! Seems like a great deal, especially after another 10% DCR discount.

    • Indeed, sorry for the delay there!

      The information from Favero was a bit…slim…for them in determining pricing. They were waiting for official confirmation of pricing (their costs, etc…) before finalizing the lower prices. The back and forth across the pond added a bit more time too of course.

      But all’s well now! And as you noted, the $735USD and then with the 10% DCR code (DCR10BTF) is really very very very solid.

  21. Ola

    Dang it, I bought a pair of bePros about two months ago. Had I known these were coming out I would have waited. Sucks to be me, I guess.

  22. Pete

    Hi Ray, don’t suppose you’ve got a set of these yet ? I had an alloy powerbox on order, which aren’t shipping, and in the meantime I’ve both destroyed the frame it was going on in a crash and the Assiomas were announced. Put off pedals in past by garmins pods, P1’s clunkiness and the price of both. These look like a great option for me – more transferrable than the powerbox without BB compatibility issues, and would allow me to get a lighter crankset. Tempted to pre-order anyway and watch for your review with bated breath !

    • Fwiw – I just received the PowerBox a few days ago. Though, it won’t get bike time till July due to other power meters in the queue ahead of it.

      As for Assiomas, they’ve said I’m at the top of the list for units, though they’ve been a bit quiet on when exactly that means. My bet is July.

  23. Pete

    PS – one of the main attractions of the Powerbox, aside from price, was the auto zeroing so no faff getting out the door in a hurry commuting. Any idea if the Assiomas are likely to have similar function, or will i have to zero part of the way into a ride ?

  24. Peter Beatty

    Thanks Ray. I’ll await further news. You’re definitely the premier source of info on such matters ! Good work.

  25. Dan

    Hi Ray,

    If the price dif is not an issue which one would you choose:

    Watteam Powerbeat or bePro / Assioma duo? For road cycling. ( Ultegra 6800) .
    Time frame is also not an issue as currently have a Stages left only..

    Thanks!
    Dan