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Scosche Rhythm+ 2.0 Heart Rate Sensor In-Depth Review

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Back in January, Scosche announced the new Rhythm+ 2.0 optical HR sensor. This would be the next iteration from their original Rhythm+ released way back in 2014 – arguably the optical HR sensor band that started the trend of optical HR armbands. Then in 2018 they released the Rhythm24, a more feature-laden product. That unit essentially added offline recording, NFC connectivity, and a pile of other features.

But the Rhythm+ 2.0 (which I’ll mostly abbreviate to R2) is much more simplistic, like the original Rhythm was. It broadcasts your heart rate over ANT+ & Bluetooth Smart, shows your zones…and…well…that’s about it. But that’s ultimately all most people want a heart rate sensor for – and of course, doing so accurately.

From a consumer standpoint the Rhythm+ 2.0 edition only changes three main things from the original: It increases the battery life from 8 hours to 24 hours, it changes the button so it doesn’t accidentally get turned on very easily, and it has a better strap that’s not Velcro. Under the covers the unit also changes the sensor too, going with a much newer Valencell version than the original.

I’ve got a bit more than two months’ worth of data on the Scosche Rhythm+ 2.0, comparing it against many of the sensors you’re likely to be choosing from, including the Polar Verity Sense, Polar OH1 Plus, mioPOD, and a slate of chest straps. Plus watches and more. I’ve got plenty of data and also basic usage tidbits.

Now, if you want all the details in one tidy video, simply hit the Play button below:

Note that once I’m done with the Scosche R2, I’ll send it and the umpteen units they sent me, back to Scosche. That’s just how I roll. If you found this post useful, consider becoming a DCR Supporter which makes the site ad-free, while also getting access to a mostly weekly video series behind the scenes of the DCR Cave. And of course, it makes you awesome.

Unboxing:

I could probably spend half a day unboxing Scosche Rhythm+ 2.0 bands. In an effort to ensure I had every color available, the company sent me not one, but two copies of every color. Plus, more interestingly, the two boxed variants of the Rhythm+ 2.0. And a charging case or two. More on both of those in a second.

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Notably, there are actually two different boxed versions of the Scosche Rhythm+ 2.0. One for retail stores, and one for Amazon. For Amazon, the box is roughly half the size. That saves on shipping (both cost and environmental aspects), and also saves on shelf space at Amazon, since Amazon charges companies based on the size of the item too. Whereas in a retail setting, you get the more descriptive one.

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Here’s a close-up of the retail one:

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Inside you’ve got the strap/pod, a USB charging cable, a paper quick start guide, and then a little yellow brochure of other Scosche products.

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Here’s the charging cable, which snaps onto the unit, meaning you could make it into a lasso if you wanted, and it’ll stay put.

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Then there’s the quick start guide:

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As for the pod, you’re gonna see plenty of photos of that, but one thing of note here is to be sure to remove the small protective film. If you leave that there, you’ll get accuracy issues:

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And the contents of the Amazon one are the same.

Then there’s the slate of straps to choose from. Material is the same, colors are (obviously) different. Notably, there’s also a grey band that’s offered specifically on Amazon.

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Finally, there’s also this new charging case accessory you can buy extra (it’s $29, but on sale for $24). Basically it’s an 860mAh USB battery pack built into the side of a small case. It charges via USB-C, but has a ‘normal’ USB port inside, so you can plug in the Scosche to it while travelling:

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I’m kinda surprised – I actually like it. Namely I find it a handy way to charge not just the Scosche R2, but anything else small – such as a watch or other HR sensor, while in transit. For example, sometimes early in the morning over breakfast, I’ll realize a watch/sensor I need isn’t charged yet – something that I might need for a workout/test once I get to the office. This has been handy to just stick the watch/sensor in there to charge, zip it up, and then throw it in my bag. I know the charging attachment won’t fall off, nice and secure in there. By the time I finish doing the morning bike commute/ and two-school drop-off with the kids, everything is charged. Plus, points for USB-C charging port on the outside (but ‘normal’ USB on the inside).

The Basics:

The Scosche R2 is a rather simple device in the grand scheme of things. At its core, you charge it, press the button to broadcast your heart rate via ANT+ & Bluetooth Smart, and then turn it off and charge it again at some point down the road. Rinse (literally), and repeat. While there’s no storage on it like the Rhythm 24 for saving workouts, it can display heart rate zones. So we’ll get into that too.

To begin, the band has been changed on the R2 to match that of the Scosche 24. However, they’ve changed the plastic a bit to hopefully eliminate any clasp snap issues. While those were rare, they did happen to some people that were traced to specific sunscreens causing the plastic to become brittle and crack. I haven’t ever had it happen to me, but figured it’s worth mentioning that they’ve noted they’ve fixed that.

In any event, the strap length adjusts via the middle piece:

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Then the band attaches to the metal pole of the pod itself:

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On the underside of the Scosche R2 is the optical sensor from Valencell, the same company Scosche tapped for their previous sensors. They generally make strong stuff, especially when in a band design (whereas they can struggle a bit more in a wrist-based product like a watch). You’ll see three LEDs, two green and one yellow. Then next to that are the photodiodes that measure that light as it reaches the blood capillaries in your arm:

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The way optical HR sensors work is by measuring the light from these LEDs. Thus, the arch-nemesis of any optical heart rate sensor is other light – such as daylight. That, in turn, happens if you wear it loosely, which is the secondary enemy of optical HR sensor accuracy: bounce. But as long as you wear it snug, you’re fine. It doesn’t need to be crazy gorilla tight or anything, but it shouldn’t move around.

According to Scosche, you can place the unit in any one of three recommended locations: upper forearm, biceps, or triceps. I tend to wear mine mostly on the biceps or triceps, since I can usually hide that below a cycling jersey or t-shirt.

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Ok, with it placed on my arm, I simply hold the button a few seconds to turn it on. That illuminates the LEDs on the underside, and then also a small colored LED atop the unit indicating it’s on. Because of the overall width of the Scosche, it’s virtually impossible to get accidentally flipped over (unlike the Polar OH1 Plus, which they largely fixed with the Verity Sense).

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At this point, it’s findable via ANT+ & Bluetooth Smart, ready for you to pair another device. Ultimately, the point of a sensor like this is to replace a heart rate strap – in turn broadcasting to something else, like an app/watch/bike computer. People tend to use optical armbands such as the Scosche because they’re more comfortable than chest straps – often especially for women.

I’ve been using the Scosche R2 with a wide assortment of devices. These have included outings paired to a Garmin Edge 830/1030, Garmin Forerunner 945, COROS Vertix, Peloton Bike & Bike+, Strava App, and more. Ultimately it perfectly followed all the ANT+ & Bluetooth Smart standards, so if there’s an app or device it doesn’t work with, frankly, that app or device is probably the issue. The ANT+/BLE code here is undoubtedly the same code as on the original Scosche, and there’s no issues there, pairing-wise. Note that they claim a 100ft range for the wireless signal, I didn’t have any reason to be that far from my watches/apps/devices, but I never had any dropout issues.

Here’s an example paired up to a Garmin Edge 1030 Plus:

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Then here it is paired to a Peloton Bike+. Note you’ll see both the ANT+ & Bluetooth sides here, so the ANT+ ID is 54, and then I’ve just tapped to pair it to the Bluetooth side (R+2.0 6422).

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The Bluetooth ID matches the last four digits imprinted on the back of the unit:

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And here to the Strava iOS app:

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Note however that while the Scosche R2 has unlimited concurrent ANT+ connections, it can only be actively paired to a single Bluetooth Smart device at a time. Meaning, you can’t pair it to both your Zwift Apple TV setup via Bluetooth Smart while also paired to your Suunto watch via Bluetooth Smart. However, you can always concurrently pair ANT+ & Bluetooth Smart. So since every Garmin/Peloton/Wahoo/Stages/Hammerhead/etc device supports ANT+ & Bluetooth Smart, you can always simply use ANT+ first, as I do.

Speaking of pairing and apps, you can download the Scosche Rhythm Sync app from the iOS/Android app stores, which lets you update the firmware and check your heart rate zones (but you can’t change them with the Scosche R2), as well as check the battery level. After downloading the app, have it search for sensors nearby (remember to turn it on first):

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If there’s a software update available, you can update that too. I suspect these will be few and far between, but in the odd event there’s some compatibility issue (as was the case initially when the R1 released or some really old Garmin watches, some 7 years ago), then they could address that.

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Ultimately though, think of the app for the R2 variant as more of a utility app than a download/record type app (whereas for the R24 edition, it does download). You likely won’t ever use the utility app beyond firmware updates.

The main point of the R2 is to broadcast to other apps, so once you’re done with your workout you’ll simply hold the top button down for a few seconds to turn it back off again. And with that, you’re done.

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The battery life is claimed at 24 hours, and seems to be trending toward that – though I haven’t done any 24-hour activities, and since it doesn’t broadcast HRV, it’s less valuable as a 24×7 type tool. The previous unit had an 8-hour battery life claim, and my testing puts this well beyond that.

Heart Rate Accuracy:

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For each test, I’m wearing additional devices, usually 3-4 in total, which capture data from other sensors.  This sometimes included a second strap, usually the Polar H10 chest strap or the Garmin HRM-PRO, as well as usually two optical sensor watches on the wrists, and then some other armband optical HR sensors. Note that the numbers you see in the upper right corner are *not* the averages, but rather just the exact point my mouse is sitting over.  Note all this data is analyzed using the DCR Analyzer, details here.

In my testing, I’m simply using the strap throughout my usual workouts.  Those workouts include a wide variety of intensities and conditions, making them great for accuracy testing.  I have a blend of interval and steady-state workouts on both running and cycling in here, both indoors and outdoors.

Ok, we’re gonna briefly look at this first boring set, a steady-state run, and then we’ll get into more exciting stuff. This set has a boatload of sensors, including both a Garmin HRM-PRO & Polar H10 chest strap (separated), a Polar OH1 Plus optical sensor, the Whoop band, a Polar Grit X watch (optical HR sensor), Garmin Enduro watch (optical HR sensor), and of course the Scosche R2, which was paired to a COROS Vertix. Here’s that data set:

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Now, I’m going to save you trying to decode that Skittles bag of rainbow colors, and just simplify it. The Scosche R2 was virtually identical to the chest straps, and essentially spot-on. As was the Polar OH1 sensor – all the same here. So rather than beat that horse a bit, let’s increase the complexity.

This time with an interval run. These were a pile of 60-second repeats at sub-5K race pace with 30-seconds of recovery. It’s a fun way to test optical HR sensors. And by fun, I mean incredibly difficult. This was compared to a mioPOD, Polar Verity Sense, Garmin HRM-PRO, and Garmin Enduro. Arguably, this is one of the more impressive sets I’ve seen in a long time for optical HR sensor testing:

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Things start off very good. You see a slight bobble from the Polar Verity Sense early on, but that’s because I thought I had turned it on, but didn’t. So I had started running a minute or so before it tried to get lock. Fair enough, that’s on me. After it locks, it’s largely fine. Let’s look at the first main interval set:

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You can see above that all the units are very very close. The exception being a burp from the mioPOD on the first interval, and a tiny 1-2 second blip on the 2nd one from Polar & mioPOD again of a few bpm off. But otherwise, it’s very clean.

And again, the last set is almost identical – super clean minus a single second blip on the interval from the mioPOD:

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So, let’s shift interval types – this time over to an indoor trainer workout. Here you can see these 30×30’s, also a beastly difficult test for optical HR sensors. But then followed by some longer duration intervals. Similar cast of characters here on the HR sensor front, got the Scosche R2 of course, but also the Whoop, Polar Verity Sense, mioPOD, and then the Polar H10 chest strap and Garmin Enduro wrist-based watch optical sensor. Here’s that data set:

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The Garmin Enduro got a slightly late start – about 30 seconds off the line, and you can clearly see the impact of that for the first minute as it catches up. After that, it’s mostly OK though. Again, a good reason to always start your watches before you start increasing intensity. The Whoop in blue…it’s just doing Whoop best – lost and underwhelmed.

Let’s zoom in on some of the intervals though, to get a closer look at things:

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From a Scosche/Mio/Polar Verity Sense/H10 chest strap standpoint, they’re virtually identical. There’s very few times where they aren’t, except the slightest of lag, often on recoveries, of perhaps a second or two.

So then, looking at the longer intervals, as we’d expect, things are quite stable and close-knit there. I mean, minus Whoop of course. It’s always astounded me just how bad that sensor is. An indoor trainer ride, steady-state at a moderate intensity is the gravy train of easy things to nail. And yet it can’t even manage that.

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Next is a Zwift ride. This one wasn’t too crazy, just a nice mostly steady ride. Here it is compared to an Apple Watch SE optical sensor, Garmin FR745 optical sensor, Polar OH1 Plus Whoop, and Polar H10 chest strap. Here’s that data:

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You can pretty easily/clearly see it’s essentially spot-on the entire time. There’s no variances there from the Scosche.

However, at the very end I throw down a nice sprint to go out on, so let’s look at that:

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You can see that the Polar H10 leads the way on responsiveness, which makes sense being a chest strap. After that, we’ve got the Scosche R2 & Apple Watch SE, and then a little bit later the Polar OH1 Plus, followed by the FR745 (wrist-based) sensor. And eventually the Whoop…sorta.

Next, let’s head outside for a road ride – which tends to be the most challenging for optical sensors, due to the vibrations off the road. Though, the further you move up your arm (placement of the sensor), the easier it is for said sensors to get accurate readings. Meaning, wrist is hardest, forearm gets a bit easier, and upper arm is easiest.

Anyway, here’s that data set compared against a Polar Verity Sense, mioPOD, Whoop Band, Garmin HRM-PRO, and a Garmin Enduro watch (optical):

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Now, at a high level it appears the Scosche R2 and Polar Verity Sense are very close to each other, and both of those are very close to the HRM-PRO chest strap. The mioPOD starts off identical to those, but then in this export appears to flat-line. In reality, it tracked just fine, but the export file from the app (or, out of HealthKit) is wonky. Unfortunately, the Mio app is mostly a dumpster fire when it comes to getting data out of it.

Wait, did someone say Dumpster Fire? To which Whoop answers: Hold my beer!

As you can see with that heavily drunk green line above, the Whoop strap does what the Whoop strap does best: Not be accurate.

So, let’s focus on the Scosche R2/Polar Verity Sense/HRM-PRO comparison here, and in particular, I want to look at a set of 4 sprints I did, one earlier on and then again later. Here’s the first set:

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Now, what we see here is that for each of these sprints, the HRM-PRO quickly picks up the change in intensity, that’s then followed by the Scosche R2 about 2-4 seconds delayed, and then the Polar Verity Sense about 1 second after that. You’ll also notice the wrist-based Garmin Enduro optical HR sensor delayed even further – pretty much missing the kick on these 15-20 second sprints. The Whoop also is delayed (less than Enduro), but doesn’t really rally as much. Here’s a closer look at that:

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And this is a perfect example of what I typically see for wrist-based (e.g. the Garmin Enduro) optical HR sensors outside cycling, especially in winter as I am now. They struggle there on sprints. If you scroll back up, you’ll see that for the steady-state portions it was fine. But these very intense 15-20 second sprints just aren’t ideal there. However, the Scosche does just fine, minus the few-second delay we see on optical HR sensors.

This played out again for the later set of sprints. The Scosche/Polar/chest strap all played the parts identical to above. And the Garmin Enduro wrist-based sensor gave the old college try, but mostly missed it. Whoop decided it just wanted to sit off to the side and continue its Tour de Drunk.

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Note that for this outdoor test the placement was on my upper arm. That’s where I tend to wear optical HR sensors like this, partially because I then hide it under the edge of my jersey, and partially because I’ve been doing this about 7-8 years and know that’s by far the best placement for accuracy.

Ok, with that – overall the sensor is perfectly accurate for seemingly everything I’ve thrown at it. Sure, you will get a few-second delay in some circumstances, namely short bursty intervals. But the peak heart rate values remain the same in those situations – so from a post-workout analytics standpoint, there’s little impact.

(Note: All of the charts in these accuracy portions were created using the DCR Analyzer tool.  It allows you to compare power meters/trainers, heart rate, cadence, speed/pace, GPS tracks and plenty more. You can use it as well for your own gadget comparisons, more details here.)

Product Comparisons:

I’ve added the Scosche Rhythm+ 2.0 to the product comparison database, allowing you to compare it to various other heart rate sensors – both chest strap and optical bands. Now, within the optical HR band category, there’s basically two classes of optical HR bands: Those that can remember stuff, and those that can’t. In other words, which ones have workout storage:

No workout storage:

– Scosche Rhythm+ 2.0 (and earlier original edition)
– Wahoo TICKR FIT

With workout storage:

– Scosche Rhythm24
– Polar OH1/OH1 Plus
– Polar Verity Sense
– mioPOD
– Whoop (not main purpose, but hey…)

Most of the ones with workout storage also have other party tricks like heart rate zone display, or added sport tracking information like swimming or port detection, or even HRV features. Point being, it’s not just workout recording, but often other random things. That said, the prices aren’t all that different in some cases, so, I’ve tried to mix and match what I think makes the most sense below. But you can use the database to make your own comparison charts.

Function/FeatureScosche RHYTHM+ 2.0Wahoo TICKR FITPolar Verity Sense
Copyright DC Rainmaker - Updated April 1st, 2021 @ 3:40 pm New Window
Price$79$79$89
Product Announce DateJan 10th, 2021Jan 3rd, 2018Feb 10th, 2021
Product Availability DateMar 15th, 2021Jan 3rd, 2018Feb 17th, 2021
Measurement TypeOpticalOpticalOptical
Typical PlacementMid/Upper ArmMid/Upper ArmUpper Arm
Battery Life24 hours30 hours20 hours
Battery TypeUSB rechargeableUSB rechargeableUSB Rechargeable
NFC CapableNoNoNo
HR TransmissionScosche RHYTHM+ 2.0Wahoo TICKR FITPolar Verity Sense
ANT+YesYesYes
Bluetooth SmartYesYesYes (dual channels)
Dual concurrent ANT+/BLEYesYesYes
Analog for gym equipmentNoNoNo
Usable HR data underwaterDepends: If on same wrist, YMMV.Depends: If on same wrist, YMMV.Using swim clip
Bridging ANT+ to Bluetooth SmartNoNoNo
Can record activity in memoryNoNoYes
Additional DataScosche RHYTHM+ 2.0Wahoo TICKR FITPolar Verity Sense
Run PaceNoNoNo
Run CadenceNoNoNo
Run Economy/MetricsNoNoNo
Cycling CadenceNoNoNo
Cycling Power Meter EstimationNoNoNo
Valid HRV/RR dataNoNoNo
Configurable Sport ModesNoNoNo
Displays HR ZonesNoNoNo
Requires Bluetooth Smart Phone for ConfigurationNoNoNo
Firmware UpdateableYesYesYes
AppScosche RHYTHM+ 2.0Wahoo TICKR FITPolar Verity Sense
Can show workout afterwardsN/AN/A (No recording)Yes
Can sync files/workout to 3rd partyN/AN/A (No recording)Yes
More InfoLinkLinkLink
PurchaseScosche RHYTHM+ 2.0Wahoo TICKR FITPolar Verity Sense
AmazonLinkLinkLink
Backcountry.comLink
Competitive CyclistLink
WiggleLinkLink

And again, you can use the database to make your own comparison charts. Oh – and yes, I’m gonna pop-out a review of the mioPOD here shortly. As any astute person will have noticed, it’s been in all my workouts the last month or two. My two-second mioPOD review would be that it mostly works fine, but seems to occasionally struggle accuracy-wise. I find the app both disappointing (it doesn’t always seem to record my workouts) and promising all at once (training load and related). And given it’s been out for some 15 or so months, the changes have basically stopped there app-wise. At $99, it’s the most expensive of the options.

Summary:

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Sometimes, if something ain’t broke – don’t fix it. And in many ways, that’s basically the Scosche Rhythm+ 2.0. They took the three things people complained about: Battery life, button accidentally turning on, and strap – and fixed them. They borrowed the button and strap from the Rhythm24, and arguably, the battery life too – also 24 hours. But beyond that, it’s very similar to before. They tweaked the sensor with a more recent custom build than the off-the-shelf build of 7 years ago – which leads to the higher battery life.

And as my testing showed, the minor changes in the optical sensor package made no difference to accuracy – it seems just as solid as before with the original. And I haven’t had any issues with the battery button turning on in my backpack or during transit.

There are very few downsides to this product, though, I’m a tiny bit surprised that they didn’t go with a dual Bluetooth Smart capable chipset, akin to what we see in most newer heart rate sensors these days from Garmin/Wahoo/Polar. It’s unlikely to be something that impacts a huge portion of the population, but given the costs to do so are pretty minor, I’d have hoped to see it.

Price-wise, it maintains the same $79 price – which matches Wahoo and their TICKR FIT optical armband. In the case of that band, I never had great accuracy with it, but perhaps I’ll pull it out of the bin and see if things have improved in the last few years with firmware updates. That unit claims a bit higher battery (30 hours), for those that might need it. Both units have the same ANT+/Bluetooth Smart connectivity.

In any event, the R2 is a solid option for someone that just wants a low-fuss offering. Turn it on, it gives you heart rate…turn it off, it’s done. Simple and easy device that’s comfortable to wear – and arguably most importantly: It’s accurate.

Found This Post Useful? Support The Site!

Hopefully you found this review useful. At the end of the day, I’m an athlete just like you looking for the most detail possible on a new purchase – so my review is written from the standpoint of how I used the device. The reviews generally take a lot of hours to put together, so it’s a fair bit of work (and labor of love). As you probably noticed by looking below, I also take time to answer all the questions posted in the comments – and there’s quite a bit of detail in there as well.

If you're shopping for the Scosche RHYTHM+ 2.0 or any other accessory items, please consider using the affiliate links below! As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. It doesn’t cost you anything extra, but your purchases help support this website a lot. Even more, if you use Backcountry.com or Competitive Cyclist with coupon code DCRAINMAKER, first time users save 15% on applicable products!

Here's a few other variants or sibling products that are worth considering:

And of course – you can always sign-up to be a DCR Supporter! That gets you an ad-free DCR, access to the DCR Quarantine Corner video series packed with behind the scenes tidbits...and it also makes you awesome. And being awesome is what it’s all about!

Thanks for reading! And as always, feel free to post comments or questions in the comments section below, I’ll be happy to try and answer them as quickly as possible. And lastly, if you felt this review was useful – I always appreciate feedback in the comments below. Thanks!

Found This Post Useful? Support The Site!

Hopefully you found this review useful. At the end of the day, I’m an athlete just like you looking for the most detail possible on a new purchase – so my review is written from the standpoint of how I used the device. The reviews generally take a lot of hours to put together, so it’s a fair bit of work (and labor of love). As you probably noticed by looking below, I also take time to answer all the questions posted in the comments – and there’s quite a bit of detail in there as well.

If you're shopping for the Scosche RHYTHM+ 2.0 or any other accessory items, please consider using the affiliate links below! As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. It doesn’t cost you anything extra, but your purchases help support this website a lot. Even more, if you use Backcountry.com or Competitive Cyclist with coupon code DCRAINMAKER, first time users save 15% on applicable products!

Here's a few other variants or sibling products that are worth considering:

And of course – you can always sign-up to be a DCR Supporter! That gets you an ad-free DCR, access to the DCR Quarantine Corner video series packed with behind the scenes tidbits...and it also makes you awesome. And being awesome is what it’s all about!

Thanks for reading! And as always, feel free to post comments or questions in the comments section below, I’ll be happy to try and answer them as quickly as possible. And lastly, if you felt this review was useful – I always appreciate feedback in the comments below. Thanks!

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72 Comments

  1. ty for the review
    just a quickie on your Miopod comment. over the last year, they have squirrelled away some changes eg the FIT export is via the 3dots in the top right corner. the training load and training effect charts are nice, as you say, but the algos come from Firstbeat…so there might be a story on whether any more such features will come from Garmin/Firstbeat. maybe that has stopped development?

    and 123666,82697,122754,23668 – images not showing in gallery on Firefox. would love to know which gallery plugin you use that works equally as well on desktop and amp, even the standard WordPress wones don’t work properly on amp.

    • Ahh, thanks on the #’s – that was a comparison table, but forgot to put the tag info so it would enumerate. Fixed!

      Good to know on the FIT export. I’ve been using HealthFit to sync them out via HealthKit in the meantime.

      As for gallery plug-in, hmm, I’ll have to poke and see.

    • Shane

      5krunner, read your MIO pod review. Waiting on Ray’s too 😀 Had bad luck with the scosche monitors. Ray, you doing a MIO pod review soon? Please

    • Yup, one coming up shortly!

  2. Pavel Vishnyakov

    Hi Ray,

    thanks for the review though I’m having a strong deja vu that I’ve seen this same review here earlier (in January).

    Do you know why Garmin doesn’t introduce a similar optical HR strap? I get that it might not be for triathletes, but for others sports it might work.

    P.S.

    In Edge Chromium some parts are not properly rendered:
    “to make your own comparison charts.

    123666,82697,122754,23668”

    • Thanks!

      Back in January was simply them announcing it, and I didn’t have a post with accuracy details or usage or such. As of today, it’s shipping. Thus, the review. 🙂

      And thanks on the charts heads-up, I just forgot to put the tag in front of it to have it render out.

    • Elliott Gruber

      Ray didn’t guess, but I would say Garmin probably doesn’t believe there is a market for an $80 optical band that didn’t seem THAT much better than their watches while they have a chest strap at $99. As a current garmin user, I’d be interested in this product for about $40-45 but if accuracy is that important to me, I would probably jump to the full chest strap.

  3. Ned Bowen

    Does the Rhythm+ 2.0 have a heart rate reading floor like how the original Rhythm would not read below 42 bpm?

    Of course, you could have downloaded a special app on iOS and changed a setting on the original Rhythm, but not if you were an android user. Also, the setting would not save if the monitor was turned off, so even borrowing a iPhone did not help. Hopefully you do not have to do that anymore if you want to read your resting HR, and it is in the mid-30’s.

  4. albor renones

    will it survive a 50 cm fall? because my old unity didn´t…

  5. M

    Kudos on avoiding the temptation to do a muscle pose with the strap placement demo shot 🙂

  6. Rob F

    1) Max/min strap circumference? I looked on Scoche’s site and the Amazon page and can’t find this seemingly simple spec.

    2) The strap attachment looks like it hooks onto standard spring pins (like from a watch) — what’s the width of the pins? I’m wondering if I could get the strap and use it on a watch.

    3) Can you provide dimensions on the charging case? Dimensions in metric, imperial, or gummy bears / oreos is acceptable. It looks very handy and I’m wondering how many different gadgets I can fit in it.

    • Fred B

      Good call out – we will add some band specs to the info.

      Rhythm24 and Rhythm+2.0 band circumference: Max 40cm / Min 17cm

      One thing to think about when reading these measurements, we are looking for optimal performance and comfort. These bands can stretch to larger circumferences, but you want the band tight enough so it doesn’t slide around, but not too tight where you’re restricting blood flow.

      Thank you Ray for your comprehensive review with the added bonus of some laughter, always fun!

      RIDE FAST!

      Fred

    • Chris

      I got the rythym HR strap today – and the strap at the largest size will barely fit on my forearm – there’s not a chance it would fit on my bicep – which is sad because I’m not that big of a guy (6’1″ – 180lbs). The old scosche strap with the velcro fit fine. Now I’m kinda sad because I was looking forward to this strap and it doesn’t look like it’s gonna work.

    • Chris

      Sorry for the 2nd response. I had tried the Polar OH+ and as other said – the battery life is HORRIBLE – but the strap is super comfortable on your bicep and had no issues going big enough, but I’m not interested in charging it after every other run.

  7. Bruno Moraes

    Hi Ray,

    thank you for the review. The amazon link for the Scosche (in the comparison table) is pointing to Wahoo TICKR FIT instead

  8. The Real Bob

    I own the Scoshe rhythm +, the Scoshe 24, and the Polar OH+. I think they are all good, I wouldn’t notice accuracy issues at my fitness levels, if it goes up when I bike harder, and down when I bike slower I am sold.

    I think battery life is important as well as another item that I don’t think you covered Ray, but you probably know everything about it and just didn’t write about it. Standby battery life.

    I have found that the Polar OH+ has terrible standby battery life. I will charge it, then take it off the charger and it will be dead a few days later (maybe a week) when I go to pick it up. That doesn’t happen with the Scoshe.

    Its a big drawback of the Polar, to the point that I stopped using it. I do think the Polar is very comfortable, but the Scoshe aren’t uncomfortable, just not as good as the Polar.

    Maybe I just have a defective Polar, but you should check it out and see if your device does the same.

    Thanks for the review.

  9. Ned

    Great review. I’ve really liked the rhythm 24 for running/cycling. Much preferred over a chest strap. I was then surprised when my young sons night time epilepsy alarm turned up with a rhythm 24. Just a shame they don’t a really small strap for him ! We have to pull it over his knee , still works a treat.

  10. Alex

    Hey,

    Is there any rumors on H10 replacement/upgrade?

    Thx

  11. jason

    Hi Ray, What’s the minimum circumference on the strap? I ask as my 8yo son “needs” a HRM for Zwiftpower results and chest straps are too big. The Tickr Fit *just* fits on his biceps, but if there was something more snug I’d be interested. Thanks.

  12. Steve W

    Apologize if I missed it, but is the charger the same as the original Rhythm+?

  13. Jason

    Man, the one thing that keeps me away from these, and basically all of them now except the OH1, is the strap attachment is fragile. I had the Wahoo and the Scosche plastic pieces that the strap attaches to break on me, it’s a busted system. Polar’s is great, it just snaps in so if something did break you could just replace the plastic piece but even that looks unlikely to break based on the way it works.

    Might be due to being in a very hot area, occasional sunscreen use, etc.. makes the plastic a bit brittle.

    • Fred B

      Hi Jason,

      We fixed this with a new polycarbonate for the housing. This issue affected a very small percentage of our customers, but as we do here at Scosche, we push to deliver the highest quality possible, so we fixed this.

      Thanks!

      –Fred

    • Jason

      Hmm.. ok that’s promising, thanks I will probably give it a try, I do prefer forearm over chest straps.

  14. CJ

    The Whoop review sounds like it is going to be epic!

    • Rui Pereira

      The Whoop review is old news. TLDR: worst performing optical heart monitor ever.

    • Paul S.

      I’m a little curious, Ray, why are you still using the Whoop?

    • Because I’m committed to making a video on it. So committed that I’ve been wearing (and paying) for this darn thing an extra 9 months at this point. One of these days I’ll walk into the video and film it.

      (Real-time: I’ve mostly been procrastinating because the nuances of how to shoot a Whoop video is substantially different than a written review. I don’t tend to script my videos, whereas for the Whoop video there’s so much nuance to that to land/nail the delivery perfectly – else I’ll just get a bunch of Whoop ambassadors/sponsored athletes complaining I missed some irrelevant thing in the comments. So, I’ve been slowly putting together my notes on all the things I want to cover.)

  15. Dean Dunn

    Will have to get one when my original Scosche Rythym dies. It’s the only thing that has lasted as my indoor HR sensor. Have had multiple Garmin HR straps and they all died, as I sweat a lot. The additional battery life of the new Scosche will be handy.

  16. Patrick

    Any thoughts on this vs the Polar Verity Sense? It appears that accuracy is a wash, but is one more comfortable than the other? The dual Bluetooth chipset on the Polar seems like a nice bonus.

    • Thomas

      I have the Verity Sense and it’s really good. I haven’t made any comparison tests – simply because I didn’t feel the need to. “Based on feel” the Verity is spot on and responsive too. I have the Verity on my bicep.

      The fit is also great – whereas the Scosche looks a bit chunky to me?!

      So far I haven’t had any issue with the Polar. Also it works great with Zwift (via BT), Kickr Headwind and my Roam bikecomputer.

      Highly recommended!

    • Patrick

      Thanks, Thomas.

  17. MikeD

    So what is the difference between R24 and R2.0?

  18. Patrick

    I had the original Rhythm+ and upgraded to the Rhythm24 two years ago when the battery life of the + was well below two hours. Optical HR bands are so nice for tracking heart rate, especially for indoor training. The Rhythm24 worked fantastically for me as a ‘footpod’ as well. I’m sure this one is also fantastic, but I would definitely recommend anybody that runs on a treadmill to buy the Rhythm24 for a few bucks more for that footpod functionality.

    • I’ve honestly ignored that level of functionality. How accurate do you find it?

    • Patrick

      Better than a footpod for me, but took some time to get there by calibration. You can trick it by altering your upper body movement, but you have to be thinking about it.

      Generally the closer you can get a sensor to your center of gravity AND limit the amount of extraneous movement, the more accurate it is going to be for estimating physical activity.

  19. Nathan B

    Amazon UK link links to the Wahoo Tickr Fit

    • Ahh…ok, I was trying to figure it out, cause it’s definitely mapping to the correct Amazon US one.

      Ouch, that’s a bad Amazon (their side) mapping luck for them. It just maps ASIN’s over. I can manually override Amazon on my side, which I’ll do.

      Thanks!

    • Bruno

      I think Amazon UK still doesn’t have it, so when we search for Scosche it shows Wahoo Tickr Fit instead.

  20. Eli

    With hrv data not being useful from this sensor doesnt that impact the first beat metrics Garmin and other devices have on them?

  21. John Tomac

    I don’t see the point to use a separate optical HR sensor. I’ts less acurate than a chest strap an consume more batery.

    When I bought my Fenix 5 I was excited because I could do the workouts without needing an externa sensor. until I realized that the built in optical sensor of the Fenix 5 is less acurate than a chest strap, specially in short intervals. Since that, I only use optical sensor for daily tracking not for training.

    • “I’ts less acurate than a chest strap an consume more batery.”

      Except, it’s not always less accurate. your Fenix 5 might have been, but there’s actually a lot of cases where upper arm based optical sensors are more accurate than chest straps – especially cooler/dryer weather (e.g. the fall), or also cycling downhill or at high speeds, which can often cause erratic readings

  22. LF

    When I started running, I used a Forerunner 230 with a Garmin chest strap. I used it religiously, but even with help, at some point the chafing on the chest was a bit too much and I started getting wounds on it, especially during the summer.

    I eventually bought a Forerunner 645 with the wrist HR measure, which works fine, I think, though even I feel it’s not as precise as the chest strap used to be. Is it worth getting the Scosche Rhythm+ 2.0 as an upgrade and pair it to the watch?

    • Paul S.

      I have a Rhythm 24, which I mostly use with a Fenix 5+ in the winter for cross country skiing. That allows me to wear my Fenix outside of my clothing, which means I can actually see it without having to stop and dig it out from under things. Since I’m a skier (a solid 4 weeks of skiing this past winter, which is average) and a cyclist (last week was the first week spent entirely on the road instead of indoors; it’s too icy to venture into the mountains at the moment), I don’t really have much use for wrist based HR. I use an old Garmin chest strap for cycling because the 24 pretends to be a cadence sensor, which can’t really be avoided (it “helpfully” changes modes on you) and I don’t really want. Every now and then, though, I forget the put on the chest strap, and then it’s just easier to slip the Rhythm on my arm rather than remove clothing to get the chest strap on.

      So if you get a Rhythm, it gives you more flexibility, possibly a little more accuracy, but it’s another thing that has to be charged occasionally and put on before a run. Only you can decide if that’s worth the cost.

  23. Kevin

    Ordering one as soon as I can. I’ve used the R24 for a little over a year now, and while it’s great, the one thing that bugs me is all the extra stuff you can’t turn off. I’d like to be able to set it in the app to HR only, but it automatically switches to “bike mode” (with whatever extra sensors they use for cadence). Every time I have to set up sensors on a head unit I have to make sure I’m connecting to the real cadence sensor, not the strap’s.
    Scosche said they have no intention of changing that. It’s not a deal breaker, but if I can get essentially the same sensor without the extra crap I’m in.

    • tracksmart

      That’s strange. I *did* set it to Heart Rate only in the app. And appears to have stayed there (i.e. I don’t get cadence data from it on my Wahoo headunit nor in my trainer rides). I have the Rhythm 24 and use it on the trainer (connected to laptop via Bluetooth) and on my bike (connected to Wahoo Elemnt Bolt). Cadence from the R24 never appears in data from use case.

      Some thoughts about why it might be working for me in *HR only* mode: Maybe I only told my Wahoo to pair it to the HR sensor (and not a separately seen cadence sensor) so the Wahoo ignores the cadence data? Or maybe it’s because I didn’t set a cadence field at all on the Wahoo? Maybe you use a Garmin or other headunit and those units behave differently when they detect the R24 (i.e. triggering the dreaded “cycling mode” with the extra features). Maybe the Android app has been updated and does a better job of semi-permanently setting it to HR only mode these days?

      Regarding the usefulness of the other features: I totally agree! This newer, simpler version that costs less is probably the right option for most people. The cycling cadence isn’t really worth using (not on the road anyway!) since it is so prone to error. The data storage isn’t that useful for anyone who is already recording their activity on another device anyway (e.g. headunit, watch, etc). Maybe the running cadence would be useful for some people when paired with a fitness watch? But don’t most fitness watches already have some kind of pedometer functionality that would make this redundant?

      I didn’t purchase the R24 for the bike cadence functionality, but I tried it on a lark. It happened to be a gravel bike ride (mix of paved and dirt roads), so kind of a worst-case scenario. WOW! It was all over the place. Especially on bumpy terrain. On smooth terrain, *while pedaling* it seemed okay, but it just made up cadence values when I wasn’t pedaling (even on relatively smooth roads). So yeah, if you want cadence, buy a cadence sensor and attach it to your bike (they are pretty darn cheap). You’ll be much happier. Especially if you ever coast or find yourself on anything that isn’t smooth pavement.

    • Kevin

      For me, if I set it to HR only in the app, pair just the HR to my Garmin, then check it again in the app it’s back in bike mode. Supposedly a feature so it automatically recognizes your activity. I had to tell my devices to ignore the rhythm’s cadence ANT+ id or risk pairing with it whenever I paired new sensors.

    • Fred B

      Hi Kevin,

      This is a function of ANT+ – it pushes the R24 into the workout mode automatically.

      –Fred

  24. gingerneil

    I have a tickr fit… Am I right in thinking that there’s nothing here for me?

    • Pos

      Most stuff works well and you don’t need to upgrade until your unit stops working for you. Some people also have money to burn and so upgrade to the latest and greatest for not much reason.

  25. Matt H

    I have trouble with chest straps because of the way I’m built. I think many have trouble maintaining contact with my skin. Wonder it this would be a better solution.

  26. Fiatlux

    I might be tempted to buy one to replace the two Rythm+… that I lost 😞.

    Still, I find those devices difficult and sometimes impossible to use when wearing long sleeves, which would be my case when running in much of the winter (and more often when cycling).

    Any tip?

  27. cougchick

    For some women, the arm strap is SO much more comfortable and convenient than a chest strap! My daughter and I are both big chested, and both of us absolutely love our Rhythm bands.

  28. Dmitry

    Heh, whoop rocks xD Was it on wrist or bicep?

    • Mostly wear it on bicep, occasionally wrist, but rarely as I’m usually wearing a watch on both wrist, so it takes up that spot.

      Bicep helps a bit with spikes, but it’s still horrendous.

  29. Eric

    Readers should be aware that the strap, while made of a very comfortable material, is rather short. I probably have arms a little bigger than average, but I was very surprised at how snug the Rhythm+ 2.0 band is at full length just around my forearm. And it is downright tight on my biceps/triceps. In comparison, my MioPod long strap is a good length for my biceps/triceps (and with room to go bigger), and I can easily snug it down for the forearm.

    I called customer service, and they indicated that they don’t have a longer strap at this time.

    I wonder if there is a compatible strap from another source. The small clearance for the strap attachment seems to limit options (i.e., my Miopod strap doesn’t easily fit onto this device).

    Thanks for your reviews! This one was nicely done, and helpful.

    • Chris

      Yeah, it says 15” – My biceps are only 13” and it cuts off circulation if I put it that high. That stinks that there isn’t a strap big enough for regular people because I was excited about this HR monitor. I guess I’ll keep using my old scosche hr monitor that goes big enough.

    • Fred B

      If the bands are too small for your massive biceps region, please reach out to the Scosche Customer Service Team and they will send you a large strap.

      –Fred

    • Chris

      Thanks! I tried contacting them 4 days ago and haven’t heard anything back yet – I’ll send another email.

    • Eric

      UPDATE: customer service tells me that they will have longer straps available “in a couple of weeks”, and to contact them later. Great news!

    • Mike Michalak

      They are sending me a larger strap today. It’s crazy how small the new strap is on the 2.0.

      I did an online chat.. had to send a screenshot of my Amazon purchase.

  30. Jan Dvořák

    Hey Ray, not really on topic…
    I have previous gen Wahoo Tickr and my strap is a toast. Could you suggest a replacement strap for me? I have easy and cheap access to Sigma Comfortex+ strap and Polar strap, other ones would be harder to get for me. My main question is, are those compatible? Thank you very much!
    Btw why is Wahoo not offering replacement straps anymore?

  31. Giles Roadnight

    A real shame that you can’t connect 2 different devices to it over BLE.

    Are there any optical HR straps that allow multiple Bluetooth connections?

  32. Eltonjc

    I use the Rhythm24 and find it very great for cycling while linked to my Karoo, along with the long battery life, especially wearing long sleeved clothing.
    I’ve found on rough roads wrist-type HR monitors (watches) loose accuracy, where the mid/upper arm type provide more reliable metrics, especially when cold, but then that’s me.
    Magically the Rhythm24 transmits cadence to a surprisingly accurate degree considering it’s on my arm!!!
    This feature alone makes it handy for jumping on my bikes not fitted with cadence sensors.
    I do hope Scosche have not permanantly replaced the Rhythm 24 with the Rhythm+2, as I was hoping they would release a unit with an SpO2 sensor & skin temperature for future analytics, along with the dual-band Bluetooth support.

  33. Kolesar1

    Hi Ray,
    does it switch off automatically if you forgot to press the button after the workout?
    Thanks

  34. Todd Donovan

    I’ve had the Rythym+ 2.0 for a couple weeks and have used it indoors and out. Connection to the Mac with BT and Ant+ dongles worked great. Outside I used with Garmin 520 on four rides. It worked well on my forearm and above my biceps – but I’m 6’5″ and 172 lbs and the strap is at full length on my upper arm. Could be tight or unusable for more muscular types. Accuracy seems good but I’m returning it because the unit won’t turn off using the switch. I’ve had to connect to the charger to turn it off.

  35. Joel

    I ordered a Rhythm 2.0 and have used it for a few rides now (indoors and outside). I’m really liking how it fits compared to a chest strap. However, I’m finding that it’s way off for the first 10 or 15 minutes (either way too low or way too high – like above my max heart rate) and then it settles down nicely after that. Is this ‘first 15 minute’ flaw something that would get fixed in a firmware update, or did I get a lemon, or is this just how these optical units work? I’m thinking of returning it and trying the new Polar Verity Sense…